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What causes hot flashes and burning sensation in the vagina?

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Posted on Tue, 5 Jul 2016
Question: I recently had an fna biopsy of my thyroid and will be going in Monday for results. I am also going for an mri of my brain and auditory canals in two weeks. These tests were ordered as a result of an episode of brain fog, dizziness and feeling like the blood has gone out of my chest. Now, while I wait for testing, I found that I have this constant low grade fever of 99.5 when I am usually 98.6. I also keep feeling hot in my face, mouth and sometimes ears. I also now have vaginal burning. I can't get to the doctors right now. Any suggestions on what this could be???
I forgot an issue...I also have a pain at the base of my skull that when I yawn it seems to radiate in my forehead for a few seconds and then goes away. I am really not sure if all of these issues are separate or part of some larger issue.
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Answered by Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (19 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Hormone tests

Detailed Answer:
Sorry to learn about your bothersome symptoms.

They are indeed an unusual constellation of problems that dont seem to be connected with each other.

People who have an over-active thyroid can feel hotter than usual. So some tests will be necessary to determine the potential causes.
When I see someone like you in my practice, I typically order the following blood tests in addition to a detailed physical examination:

CBC (Complete Blood Count, also known as Hemogram; includes Hemoglobin, WBC and Platelet counts)
Electrolytes (Sodium and Potassium in particular)
HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin = your last 3 months' glucose average). Also known by other names such as GlycoHemoglobin or Glycated Hemoglobin or A1c
Liver function tests (SGOT , SGPT, Albumin, Bilirubin, Alkaline Phosphatase)
Kidney function tests (BUN, Creatinine)
TSH (checks your thyroid)
Free T4 (this too checks your thyroid)
25 hydroxy Vitamin D levels (ideal range 40 to 60 ng/ml = 100 to 150 nmol/liter)

None of these tests require any fasting and can be done at any time of the day
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Follow up: Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (1 hour later)
I did have bloodwork done when I went to a routine appointment in the fall and then again when I went to the Emergency Room during the episode I had (the episode happened on March 13th). My doctor said that my thyroid levels were good back in the Fall and he has me on 1000mg Vitamin D everyday indefinitely because my levels were low before. He said they aren't now. Honestly, I'm not sure of what other tests they did outside of the white blood cell count and whatever tests the do to make sure you didn't have a stroke or heart attack or blood clots. However, your thought that I should get my hormone levels checked actually makes sense. I am following up with my surgeon, who is a thyroid specialist, on Monday with regard to my FNA results. What about the neck issue? In the center of my neck right at the base of my skull it feels like there is an ache there and when I stretch or yawn, it's like the pain briefly radiates to my forehead and then goes away. I'm not sure if that is your area, but it would be great to know what that's all about.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Shehzad Topiwala (13 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Follow up

Detailed Answer:
That pain you are experiencing does not seem to fit any typical headache pattern. However, it could be related to the spine. You should talk to your doctor about getting an X ray of the spine. If the ache persists, you should consider seeing a neurologist
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Dr. Shehzad Topiwala

Endocrinologist

Practicing since :2001

Answered : 1663 Questions

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What causes hot flashes and burning sensation in the vagina?

Brief Answer: Hormone tests Detailed Answer: Sorry to learn about your bothersome symptoms. They are indeed an unusual constellation of problems that dont seem to be connected with each other. People who have an over-active thyroid can feel hotter than usual. So some tests will be necessary to determine the potential causes. When I see someone like you in my practice, I typically order the following blood tests in addition to a detailed physical examination: CBC (Complete Blood Count, also known as Hemogram; includes Hemoglobin, WBC and Platelet counts) Electrolytes (Sodium and Potassium in particular) HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin = your last 3 months' glucose average). Also known by other names such as GlycoHemoglobin or Glycated Hemoglobin or A1c Liver function tests (SGOT , SGPT, Albumin, Bilirubin, Alkaline Phosphatase) Kidney function tests (BUN, Creatinine) TSH (checks your thyroid) Free T4 (this too checks your thyroid) 25 hydroxy Vitamin D levels (ideal range 40 to 60 ng/ml = 100 to 150 nmol/liter) None of these tests require any fasting and can be done at any time of the day