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What causes headache, dizziness and elevated heart rate?

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Posted on Thu, 12 Nov 2015
Question: Hi my name is XXXXXXX I'm 46 yrs old with clip of brain MCA 4yrs ago .. and heart arrhythmia .. What can be the symptoms now about headaches and spinal cord pain and as it comes all the sudden then I get dizziness and close to faint ? Heart rate was 62 bp 105/70 should I be concern? It's Been few times happen to me today all symptoms at same time with feeling of head cloud then after dizziness or close to faint don't last long but I will recover as it comes all sudden can you tell me if that be concerning ?
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Answered by Dr. Saddiq Ulabidin (50 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Seems like Syncopal attacks, needs detailed work up with holter

Detailed Answer:
Hi! Welcome to health care magic!

Based on the history you have shared, it seems as if you have suffered with cardiac Syncopal attacks.

Actually, such close to fainting episodes and cloudiness can't be ignored as for a normal individual, to have such events can be a tip of the iceberg. Also that the history of arrhythmia and MCA territory blocks in the past call for little more concerns too.

Broadly speaking, Such events can generally be due to four main causes: Cardiac, neurological, metabolic or related to inner ear.

For Cardiac causes, a 24 hour EKG monitoring is mandatory to look for any episodes of arrytmias alongwith looking for postural drop, that is the sudden drop of blood pressure on postural changes due to any defect in baroreceptors or Autonomic neuropthies.

For neurological causes, carotid doppler and brain MRA can be suggested to look for any abnormalities to blood supply of brain leading to such transient attacks alongwith to exclude any clot in the brain vasculature.

For metabolic derangement electrolytes levels alongwith thyroid and sugar levels needs to be confirmed in blood screening.

For ear causes, tilt test and ENT examination may be needed.

All these workups, needs to be shared with your GP to proceed accordingly.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Raju A.T
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Follow up: Dr. Saddiq Ulabidin (4 hours later)
Thanks for answering my question & concern .. What is postural drop ? It's that relate to my heart or brain or both?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Saddiq Ulabidin (55 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Postural drop is drop of blood pressure on rising up

Detailed Answer:
Hi! Thanks for sharing your concerns. Postural drop means that automatic control of blood pressure from lying to sitting up to maintain a constant blood pressure is lost, and a person when gets up suddenly or changes posture the blood pressure drops down and such near to fainting spell are observed. Hoping you a speedy recovery. If you dont have any more questions, please close the discussion. Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Yogesh D
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Answered by
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Dr. Saddiq Ulabidin

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2011

Answered : 3941 Questions

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What causes headache, dizziness and elevated heart rate?

Brief Answer: Seems like Syncopal attacks, needs detailed work up with holter Detailed Answer: Hi! Welcome to health care magic! Based on the history you have shared, it seems as if you have suffered with cardiac Syncopal attacks. Actually, such close to fainting episodes and cloudiness can't be ignored as for a normal individual, to have such events can be a tip of the iceberg. Also that the history of arrhythmia and MCA territory blocks in the past call for little more concerns too. Broadly speaking, Such events can generally be due to four main causes: Cardiac, neurological, metabolic or related to inner ear. For Cardiac causes, a 24 hour EKG monitoring is mandatory to look for any episodes of arrytmias alongwith looking for postural drop, that is the sudden drop of blood pressure on postural changes due to any defect in baroreceptors or Autonomic neuropthies. For neurological causes, carotid doppler and brain MRA can be suggested to look for any abnormalities to blood supply of brain leading to such transient attacks alongwith to exclude any clot in the brain vasculature. For metabolic derangement electrolytes levels alongwith thyroid and sugar levels needs to be confirmed in blood screening. For ear causes, tilt test and ENT examination may be needed. All these workups, needs to be shared with your GP to proceed accordingly.