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Suggest treatment for growth of enterococcus faecalis

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Posted on Fri, 22 May 2015
Question: Hi. Am 34 years old and trying to get pregnant.
I recently had a swab test and it revealed growth of enterococcus faecalis. So the doctor has suggested levoflaxacin antibiotic to me for 5 days. Since am trying to get pregnant ( not sure if only already am) I am not sure if I should take the antibiotics. Is it safe to have these meds?
And what if one dont take these antibiotics will it have XXXXXXX adverse effect if am already pregnant?
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Answered by Dr. Deepti Verma (28 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Levofloxacin not recommended in pregnancy

Detailed Answer:
Hi XXXX, I have gone through your question and understand your concerns.
I would first like to confirm that whether by swab test you mean a vaginal swab examination.
Enterococcus faecalis growth in vaginal smear examination is usually a contaminant from the surrounding perineal and anal area during the sampling, and is very rarely the original pathogen of the vagina or cervix. It is not usually recommended to take any treatment for such contaminant growth, if you do not have symptoms of foul smelling vaginal discharge and lower pain abdomen.
Levofloxacin is a FDA category C drug which means animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks.Levofloxacin is shown to cause cartilage damage and arthropathy in animal fetuses, especially if exposure was in first trimester. It is not advisable to take this drug if you are having early pregnancy or planning pregnancy.
In my opinion, it is not advisable to take levofloxacin for such contaminant growth in vaginal smear. There will be no harm to fetus, in case you are pregnant, if you don't take levofloxacin for contaminant growth.
I would suggest you to get your vaginal smear examination repeated to confirm if any infection is present and take antibiotics which are safer in pregnancy.

Hope you found the answer helpful. Please do get back for further queries.
Wishing you good health.
Regards,
Dr Deepti Verma

Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Prasad
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Answered by
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Dr. Deepti Verma

OBGYN, Maternal and Fetal Medicine

Practicing since :2009

Answered : 5068 Questions

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Suggest treatment for growth of enterococcus faecalis

Brief Answer: Levofloxacin not recommended in pregnancy Detailed Answer: Hi XXXX, I have gone through your question and understand your concerns. I would first like to confirm that whether by swab test you mean a vaginal swab examination. Enterococcus faecalis growth in vaginal smear examination is usually a contaminant from the surrounding perineal and anal area during the sampling, and is very rarely the original pathogen of the vagina or cervix. It is not usually recommended to take any treatment for such contaminant growth, if you do not have symptoms of foul smelling vaginal discharge and lower pain abdomen. Levofloxacin is a FDA category C drug which means animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks.Levofloxacin is shown to cause cartilage damage and arthropathy in animal fetuses, especially if exposure was in first trimester. It is not advisable to take this drug if you are having early pregnancy or planning pregnancy. In my opinion, it is not advisable to take levofloxacin for such contaminant growth in vaginal smear. There will be no harm to fetus, in case you are pregnant, if you don't take levofloxacin for contaminant growth. I would suggest you to get your vaginal smear examination repeated to confirm if any infection is present and take antibiotics which are safer in pregnancy. Hope you found the answer helpful. Please do get back for further queries. Wishing you good health. Regards, Dr Deepti Verma