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Suggest medicine for vestibular migraine

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Posted on Fri, 18 Jul 2014
Question: Hi I saw a nurologist last week after suffering with lightheadness for past nearly three years he has dignoised me with vestibular migraines.,,, I had MRIs and CT scans and numerous blood tests which have come back fine... my question today is he put me on sandomigraine to prevent the migraines is this best medication... only other medication I am on is coverram for my high BP. also what is the best medication to take if I get the vestibular migrain is it panadol, nurofen, asprin or what?.

also I am now trying to work out trigger and not really getting anywhere I am thinking it could be just a hormonal thing as I get older.. as I have not changed my diet other then eating healthier but had the lightheadness before and changing diet does not help. I dont smoke and only socail drinking which is very occasional. any ideas on what trigger could be
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Answered by Dr. Shoaib Khan (8 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Good medication; ?? hormonal in your case

Detailed Answer:
Hello ma'am and welcome.

Thank you for writing to us.

I have gone through your query with diligence and would like you to know that I am here to help.

First of all, sandomigraine (containing the active ingredients Pizotifen) is a good medication to prevent migraine headaches. Although,the standard medications used to treat migraine headaches are propanolol and/or sumatriptan. These are all good medications which have proven to have good effects against migraine headaches, so if at all you do not achieve good results with sandomigraine, you could request your doctor for a change in prescription to either of the above two mentioned contents.

As for triggers, there are various ma'am, and they differ in each individual. I am a migraine sufferer as well. For me the triggering factors are lack of sleep and starvation (due to my long working hours). Let me list some of the most common causes out for you:
-Long gaps between meals
-Hormonal causes (especially in women; most likely the cause for your headaches)
-Long hours of exposure to extreme temperatures (heat or cold)
-Lack of sleep (erratic sleep patterns; especially seen in shift workers)
-Sugar containing food or drinks
-Specific food items (eg. salty items, cheese, etc.)
-Stress
-Physical factors
and a few others. But based on the information provided by you, I am assuming a hormonal cause to be the culprit in your specific case.

I hope you find my response both helpful and informative ma'am. Please feel free to write back to me for any further clarifications, I would be more than happy to help you.

Best wishes.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Vinay Bhardwaj
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Answered by
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Dr. Shoaib Khan

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2009

Answered : 9409 Questions

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Suggest medicine for vestibular migraine

Brief Answer: Good medication; ?? hormonal in your case Detailed Answer: Hello ma'am and welcome. Thank you for writing to us. I have gone through your query with diligence and would like you to know that I am here to help. First of all, sandomigraine (containing the active ingredients Pizotifen) is a good medication to prevent migraine headaches. Although,the standard medications used to treat migraine headaches are propanolol and/or sumatriptan. These are all good medications which have proven to have good effects against migraine headaches, so if at all you do not achieve good results with sandomigraine, you could request your doctor for a change in prescription to either of the above two mentioned contents. As for triggers, there are various ma'am, and they differ in each individual. I am a migraine sufferer as well. For me the triggering factors are lack of sleep and starvation (due to my long working hours). Let me list some of the most common causes out for you: -Long gaps between meals -Hormonal causes (especially in women; most likely the cause for your headaches) -Long hours of exposure to extreme temperatures (heat or cold) -Lack of sleep (erratic sleep patterns; especially seen in shift workers) -Sugar containing food or drinks -Specific food items (eg. salty items, cheese, etc.) -Stress -Physical factors and a few others. But based on the information provided by you, I am assuming a hormonal cause to be the culprit in your specific case. I hope you find my response both helpful and informative ma'am. Please feel free to write back to me for any further clarifications, I would be more than happy to help you. Best wishes.