question-icon

Can vagal nerve stimulation cause bradycardia?

default
Posted on Tue, 26 May 2015
Question: . I read that the vagus nerve can slow down your heart rate. I do get some acid reflux or Gerd and I have slight bradycardia as I mentioned to you last time. Sometimes I'll get episodes where I Bend down and get up or just even sitting still and I'll have pressure coming up to my throat from my stomach. It feels like a lump in throat from food coming up but not acidic. I'll check my pulse and it will be very slow but hard for 5 to 7 beats. Can Gerd or acid reflux be causing this to happen? It is quite scary and I know exactly when it's happening cause I get the lump in throat I had all cardiac tests done including stress test, Echocardiogram, ecg 48 hour holter. All came back with structurally normal heart just some pacs 400 per 48 hour and 15 unifocal pvc
doctor
Answered by Dr. Benard Shehu (2 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Yes GERD and vagal nerve stimulation is causing symptoms...

Detailed Answer:
Hi XXXXXXX again.

Yes it's true that vagal nerve stimulation cause bradycardia. The vagal nerve is stimulated from gastric acidity, reflux, pain etc.

The symptoms you are describing are typical for GERD (acid reflux) and vagal nerve stimulation.

My opinion is that the proper treatment and stabilisation of GERD will be of help on relieving your symptoms.

My opinion is that you should take antacids (Malox), probiotics and PPI drugs (omeprasol) to treat acid reflux. This will help on reliving your symptoms to.

Hope this was of help!
Wish you health!
Dr. Shehu
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
default
Follow up: Dr. Benard Shehu (5 hours later)
Hi doctor thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. I understand now that Gerd can cause the vagus nerve stimulation and cause my bradycardia. I just wanted to know is this harmful? Also are the etopic that are caused by Gerd and anxiety harmful?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Benard Shehu (1 hour later)
Brief Answer:
Following answer to your queries...

Detailed Answer:
Hi back,

Bradycardia associated with vagus nerve stimulation and GERd isn't harmful and you shouldn't worry about that.

Moreover ectopic beats associated with GERD and anxiety aren't harmful as long as your heart is normal (examinations are normal).

Wish you health!
Dr. Shehu
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
default
Follow up: Dr. Benard Shehu (15 hours later)
Hi doctor thank you for your reply. Is it true that etopic beats only become worrisome when they account for more than 15-20 % of your total beats? I have heard of people having 25 000 per day
doctor
Answered by Dr. Benard Shehu (4 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Following advice...

Detailed Answer:
Hi back,

What you have read isn't true. Premature atrial beats and other etopic beats will not become worrisome when they account for more than 15-20 % of your total beats.

You should stay relaxed and don't worry about those thoughts. It will only increase your anxiety level. There are people who have more than 25000 etopic heart beats per day and have a normal life.

Wish you health!
Dr. Shehu


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Benard Shehu

Cardiologist

Practicing since :2004

Answered : 2257 Questions

premium_optimized

The User accepted the expert's answer

Share on
Can vagal nerve stimulation cause bradycardia?

Brief Answer: Yes GERD and vagal nerve stimulation is causing symptoms... Detailed Answer: Hi XXXXXXX again. Yes it's true that vagal nerve stimulation cause bradycardia. The vagal nerve is stimulated from gastric acidity, reflux, pain etc. The symptoms you are describing are typical for GERD (acid reflux) and vagal nerve stimulation. My opinion is that the proper treatment and stabilisation of GERD will be of help on relieving your symptoms. My opinion is that you should take antacids (Malox), probiotics and PPI drugs (omeprasol) to treat acid reflux. This will help on reliving your symptoms to. Hope this was of help! Wish you health! Dr. Shehu