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What Does My Lab Test Report Indicate?

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Posted on Sun, 15 Oct 2017
Question: Hello,

I'm 22 years old, just got a blood test, and my LDH is 294 U/L (my lab range is: 240 - 480 U/L) but when I check on the internet I see ranges are : 140 to 280 U/L on webmd for example ...

It's a bit worrying ... is my LDH higher or not than normal? I'm confused

Thanks!
doctor
Answered by Dr. Ramesh Kumar (35 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Every lab has its own normal range.

Detailed Answer:
Hello Dear patient,
Thanks for choosing HealthcareMagic for your query.
Have gone through your details and i appreciate your concerns.

See my dear what you read on internet is a standard reading but these readings vary from laboratory to laboratory and from country to country there are a number of differebt type of instruments and methods to perform a particular test therefore while considering readings of a lab we have to consider the normal value given by that laboratory only.
In medical language Any biological parameter that is measured in a population needs a defined physiological or ‘normal’ range. But every test is affected by pre-analytical variables like technique and timing of blood collection, posture of patient and the transport and storage of specimens. Then there are variations in the analytic technique which impact on the test result. But most of these can be standardised. Problem is caused by inherent factors of age, sex, body build, occupation, genetic background, diet, altitude of residence etc., which affect test values. All these variables have to be taken into account while defining ‘normal’ values. A reference interval is typically established by assaying specimens that are obtained from individuals that meet carefully defined criteria (reference sample group). It is difficult to be certain in any survey of a population for the purpose of obtaining data from which ‘normal’ ranges are established that ‘normal’ subjects are completely healthy. Analyte values for the normal and abnormal will overlap, and a value within the recognised normal range may be definitely pathological in a particular subject. For this reason the concept of ‘normal ranges’ or ‘normal values’ has been replaced by ‘reference limits’ and ‘reference values’ in which the variables are defined when establishing the values for a reference population. For any test, the range between the reference limits is called the reference interval and ideally each laboratory should establish its own. This is typically established by analysing a minimum of 120 reference samples.
As per your lab your LDL is perfectly normal and i don't think you need o worry at all.


Thanks!
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Prasad
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Ramesh Kumar (48 minutes later)
Thank you very much for the detailed answer!
doctor
Answered by Dr. Ramesh Kumar (13 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Stay happy and blessed.

Detailed Answer:
I wish you a great day ahead dear.
Hope i was helpful.
Do write a review.
Regards!
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Prasad
doctor
Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Ramesh Kumar

Gastroenterologist

Practicing since :1986

Answered : 2805 Questions

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What Does My Lab Test Report Indicate?

Brief Answer: Every lab has its own normal range. Detailed Answer: Hello Dear patient, Thanks for choosing HealthcareMagic for your query. Have gone through your details and i appreciate your concerns. See my dear what you read on internet is a standard reading but these readings vary from laboratory to laboratory and from country to country there are a number of differebt type of instruments and methods to perform a particular test therefore while considering readings of a lab we have to consider the normal value given by that laboratory only. In medical language Any biological parameter that is measured in a population needs a defined physiological or ‘normal’ range. But every test is affected by pre-analytical variables like technique and timing of blood collection, posture of patient and the transport and storage of specimens. Then there are variations in the analytic technique which impact on the test result. But most of these can be standardised. Problem is caused by inherent factors of age, sex, body build, occupation, genetic background, diet, altitude of residence etc., which affect test values. All these variables have to be taken into account while defining ‘normal’ values. A reference interval is typically established by assaying specimens that are obtained from individuals that meet carefully defined criteria (reference sample group). It is difficult to be certain in any survey of a population for the purpose of obtaining data from which ‘normal’ ranges are established that ‘normal’ subjects are completely healthy. Analyte values for the normal and abnormal will overlap, and a value within the recognised normal range may be definitely pathological in a particular subject. For this reason the concept of ‘normal ranges’ or ‘normal values’ has been replaced by ‘reference limits’ and ‘reference values’ in which the variables are defined when establishing the values for a reference population. For any test, the range between the reference limits is called the reference interval and ideally each laboratory should establish its own. This is typically established by analysing a minimum of 120 reference samples. As per your lab your LDL is perfectly normal and i don't think you need o worry at all. Thanks!