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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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Is there any LDL particle size test for predisposed artherogenesis

Good morning from East London, South Africa.

Could you please tell me if there is a LDL particle size test that one could request the Laboratories to perform in order to determine whether one is more likely to be predisposed to atherogenesis.

Jennifer Posthumus
Mon, 14 Jul 2014
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Infectious Diseases Specialist 's  Response
lipoprotein subfraction and LDL sub fraction testing is not diagnostic test. The test evaluates LDL particles according to their number, size, density, and/or electrical charge. It may offer useful information for assessing risk in people who have a personal or family history of heart disease at a young age, especially if their total and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) values are not significantly elevated. It may also be occasionally ordered to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. The result is interpreted within the framework of a lipid profile and its associated risk. If a person has a large number of primarily small, dense LDL and an increased LDL-P, this finding will add to the individual's risk of developing CVD above and beyond the risk associated with the total LDL.
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Is there any LDL particle size test for predisposed artherogenesis

lipoprotein subfraction and LDL sub fraction testing is not diagnostic test. The test evaluates LDL particles according to their number, size, density, and/or electrical charge. It may offer useful information for assessing risk in people who have a personal or family history of heart disease at a young age, especially if their total and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) values are not significantly elevated. It may also be occasionally ordered to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. The result is interpreted within the framework of a lipid profile and its associated risk. If a person has a large number of primarily small, dense LDL and an increased LDL-P, this finding will add to the individual s risk of developing CVD above and beyond the risk associated with the total LDL.