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What do these X-ray findings indicate?

DOCTOR OF THE MONTH - May 2014
May 2014
User rating for this question
Excellent
Answered by

Radiologist
Practicing since : 2002
Answered : 6511 Questions
Question
I was told several years ago (three or so) that I had a very small hemangioma on my T5 vertebrae. It was an incidental finding and I was told it would probably never grow or do anything. I am just curious if it's visible in any of these xrays. I assume it's not as I was told these were normal (except for some mild scoliosis). I also assume that they have to get rather big before they are visible.

In regards to the cervical xray, I was also told there were severe degenerative changing and some bulging.
Mon, 16 Apr 2018 in General Health
 
 
Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail 1 hour later
Brief Answer:
The suspected hemagioma in T5 is small and there is cervical disc problem

Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Thanks for writing in to us.

There is a small opacity in the lower part of T5 vertebra. This is very small and likely representing the hemangioma. It is not big enough to cause any concern. It does not seem to have grown significantly I suppose from the time it was previously visualised. It will help to know if the previous diagnosis was made on a xray or any CT scan or MRI scan of the spine.

The cervical spine xray shows anterior and posterior marginal osteophytes in C5, C6 and C7 vertebrae. There is mild narrowing of C6-C7 disc space and the posterior marginal osteophytes cause degenerative disc changes and disc bulge in to the spinal canal. This area is visualised in detail on MRI scans.

Hope your query is answered.
Please do write back if you have any doubts.

Regards,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: What do these X-ray findings indicate? 45 minutes later
The original image was done by MRI when they noted the hemangioma. I will attach previous xrays from a few years ago. I'm curious if you can compare the sizes and see if they are the same. Is the rest of the spine (besides the cervical stuff) normal?


I have also uploaded the original MRI report - I don't have the images anymore.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail 48 minutes later
Brief Answer:
The opacity is less clear in the 2011 xray and is of similar size

Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Thanks for writing back with an update.

The hemangioma is not very clearly visualised in the xray done in March 2014 but a similar sized opacity is visualised in the T5 vertebra. It does not show significant change in size.

The rest of the thoracic spine is normal.

I remember viewing your lumbar spine images in October 2017 and there were some mild degenerative changes.

Your MRI report is not found in the list of uploaded images.

Regards,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: What do these X-ray findings indicate? 34 minutes later
Oh sorry, I thought I attached it. I will attach now. So, just to clarify, you can see the opacity in the March 2014 images and it's a similar size but it's less clear. What kind of things would change the clearness? Could weight do it? I weighed quite a bit more in 2014 than I do now. Can you see it in the earlier 2017 images? Those are the ones labeled: 02-03-2017.

I'm curious if hemangiomas go away on their own. As I understand it, you don't see this impinging on my spinal column at all and therefore it can be ignored?

The original MRI report didn't even mention it in the findings; I think they just noted it for the record.


It seems to not be allowing me to attach the MRI. Here is what it said:
FINDINGS: The thoracic spinal cord is normal. In the cervical spine bulging of the annulus and central protrusions are seen at C4-5, C5-6 and C6-7. There is no cord deformity. Axial images were not included of these levels.
T1-T2, T2-3, T3-4, T4-5, T5-6, T6-7, T?-8, T8-9, T9-10, T10-11, T11-12, T12-L1. There is no protrusion, central canal or foraminal stenosis. The cord and thecal sac contents are normal.
Moderate dorsal paraspinal muscle atrophy is seen. A small right pleural effusion is identified measuring maximally 0.5 cm. Cardiomegaly is identified.
A region of increased signal intensity is seen on the T1 and T2 sequence in the left side of the T5 vertebral body consistent with a small hemangioma.


I am curious is the opacity is what I have circled in the newly uploaded image: SIDEVIEWCHEST1
 
 
Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail 10 hours later
Brief Answer:
Please upload side view chest 1 image again after deleting old ones

Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Thanks for writing back with an update.

The area is less clear in 2014 xrays because of likely technical reasons including the strength and penetration of the xrays. This is not a serious problem.

The xray dated 02 13 2017 is showing the chest in frontal view and the hemangioma in T5 vertebra is not appreciated. The hemangioma is visualised only on the side view images.

Thanks for sharing the report and as described by you, the hemangioma is mentioned for the record.

I am not able to find any sideviewchest1 picture. I guess you need to remove earlier pictures and upload new ones for me to view.

Regards,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: What do these X-ray findings indicate? 8 hours later
Hi - It should be up there now.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail 2 hours later
Brief Answer:
The white area in the circle is likely representing the hemangioma

Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Thanks for writing back with an update.

Yes you are right. The white area in the circle is likely representing the hemangioma in T5 vertebra.

Regards,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: What do these X-ray findings indicate? 5 hours later
Thank you again for your answer. I've attached the side view from February 2017 - I circled where I think it is but, again, it's much more faint which I understand is really about technique. I'm curious if you see it, however.

Also, my last question is in regard to hemangiomas - do they ever go away on their own? I assume that unless they grow they can just be ignored?

Thank you again.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail 7 hours later
Brief Answer:
Hemangiomas are small clumps of blood vessels like birth marks

Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Thanks for writing back with an update.

In the february 2017 picture the circle area does not look like the hemangioma and the entire area is unclear.

Hemangiomas are a clump of blood vessels similar to birth marks under the skin. These usually stay for a life time.

Regards,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: What do these X-ray findings indicate? 2 minutes later
Thank you again. Out of curiosity what could make an xray unclear? Could I have had a cold or congestion? I assume it cleared up since the more recent one was clear.

I recall that I had a cold or bronchitis during these X-rays so I’m wondering if that matters.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Vivek Chail 17 minutes later
Brief Answer:
There are multiple factors affecting the clarity of xrays

Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Thanks for writing back with an update.

There are many layers of tissues through which the xray has to pass before an image is generated. So when taking a lateral xray or side view we have the xrays pass through the skin, subcutaneous fat, the ribs and intercostal muscles, the lung and the mediastinum and heart and again the opposite lune, the ribs and intercostal muscles, subcutaneous fat, skin and then the image cassette.

It does not mean that you had a cold congestion.

Therefore you can see the potential areas where differences in opacity of tissues can cause technical difficulties and make areas unclear in the xray.

Apart from this the voltage and current used to generate xrays also matters when taking the xray.

Regards,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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