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What causes false positive results for Xanax?

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Psychiatrist
Practicing since : 2007
Answered : 2770 Questions
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I know you've heard this before but... I just tested positive for Xanax in a urine screen. I am stunned. I do not take Xanax at all. I do not take any drug not prescribed. I am prescribed Meloxicam, levothyroxin, gabapentin, and tizanidine due to injuries in near fatal car wreck. I do take herbs I order from XXXXXXX I am desperate to know how I could find out what herb would cause this because I don't want to take it any more. I don't want to stop all herbs because they are helping me with pain. Still, I am so horrified and I feel humiliated. My doctor says she believes me. She's known me for a long time but I can't help but wonder if she has at least a small doubt. Regardless I really need to know what would cause this.
Posted Wed, 13 Aug 2014 in Drug Abuse
 
 
Answered by Dr. Srikanth Reddy 3 hours later
Brief Answer:
Herbs may have a benzodiazepine

Detailed Answer:
Hello,

Thanks for choosing health care magic for posting your query.

I have gone through your question in detail and I can understand what you are going through.

The herbs many times contain so many contents and its difficult to identify which of the content was mimicking the benzodiazepine called xanax. Now that it has come positive, there is a possibility that it may come postive everytime here after as well. The fact that the machine could detect xanax , then it is likely that the herb you are taking could be having xanax like compund. In that case although it may be helping you right now but in the long run it may not be beneficial for you as it may cause dependence.
There are many different allopathic medicines which are availbe and for that reason you can doscintinue taking herbs.
Hope I am able to answer your concerns.

If you have any further query, I would be glad to help you.

If not, you may close the discussion and if possible you may rate the answer for me, so that I get a good feedback.

In future if you wish to contact me directly, you can use the below mentioned link:

bit.ly/dr-srikanth-reddy



Wish you good health,

Kind regards

Dr. Srikanth Reddy M.D.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: What causes false positive results for Xanax? 29 minutes later
The only reason why I could have a false positive for Xanax that I can possibly think of is an herb that I am taking. I just needed to know if this was possible. I am just so stunned. I thought these tests were 100% accurate but now I know that is impossible. Is there any other reason why this could happen that I should consider? I have no interest in taking Xanax or anything that would mimic it. I take herbs for inflammation and good health. I would to know where or who could identify which herb would do this to avoid this ever happening again. Are you aware of any particular types of herbs that cause this? Is there a laboratory that could identify whatever was or is in my system? I hope you can understand why I want to avoid to ever have this happen again. I know I don't take Xanax but what if I were in a wreck and drug tested and I had a false positive? For example, my doctor knows I don't take Xanax but law enforcement would more than likely trust the drug test.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Srikanth Reddy 22 hours later
Brief Answer:
Answers as asked

Detailed Answer:
Hello
Thanks for the follow-up query.
No its not possible to exactly identify which drug in the herb would actually be causing these symptoms. Its better to avoid the herb or to replace wit with proper allopathic treatment.
Now that the urine test has come positive you can always request for a repeat test and this time may be you can also request for the test on hair sample. This will make the test more specific and prevent false positives.
Hope this helps
Kind regards
Dr. Srikanth Reddy
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: What causes false positive results for Xanax? 11 hours later
That's just it. I take about 10 herbs so I don't know which one to stop taking. I don't want to stop taking all of them because of the single one that caused a false positive. The herbs really help me. I'm hoping the lab can identify the herb. Surely this must be possible. It has to be an herb, vitamin, or Aleve because I know I did not take Xanax. My doctor did say they just started using a new test and she's been getting a number of false positives with other patients. She told me to continue taking the herbs. But I still want to know what caused my false positive. I guess I'll hope the lab tells us what herb and if not, I will see if a hair sample will. I know science is capable of figuring this out somehow. Thank you.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Srikanth Reddy 36 hours later
Brief Answer:
The routine tests do not

Detailed Answer:
Hello
The hair sample test may be helpful.
Further the routine tests that are done for the patients in the lab do not have such tests to identify which herb cross reacts with the bezo. However there may be such test in the expert labs of botany in your area. These tests might be being used for research purpose only. YOu may request a botany expert in your area to help you know which test can be done.
Kind regards
Dr. Srikanth Reddy
MD
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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