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Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

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What can lead to severe bouts of hot flashes after an accident?

Answered by
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Dr. Suresh Heijebu

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2010

Answered : 3579 Questions

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Posted on Thu, 20 Dec 2018 in Back Pain
Question: I was involved in an auto accident 10 months ago and have developed severe bouts of hot flashes. I mentioned it to my nuerologist and he did not have an answer. I think my I have herniatiin in my disk of my neck and had whip-lash and a concussion. The severity of the flashes are becoming worse.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Suresh Heijebu 1 hour later
Brief Answer:
Spine injury can cause hot flashes.

Detailed Answer:

Hello,

I can certainly understand your concern.

Hot flashes are suggestive of autonomic nervous system / Endocrinal dysfunction.

Spine lesions and Thyroid issues are few important and common causes non menopausal hot flashes

The possibility of significant cervical spine injury( compressive herniation of disc) should be ruled out in your case by appropriate scanning technique.

For this I generally recommend MRI scan of the cervical spine in all my patients with a possible Whiplash injury.

Likewise it's advisable not to miss Thyroid issues by taking up complete Thyroid profile test.

Meanwhile it's advisable to consider treatment for such frequent and distressing hot flashes. I generally recommend oral pills of Paroxiteine to my patients with such symptoms. Please check with your physician if he shares my view and if can prescribe medications to improve your symptoms.

Review with test reports to determine further course of action.

Hope I have answered all your questions.

Post your further queries if any.

Thank you.




Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Nagamani Ng
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Follow up: Dr. Suresh Heijebu 9 days later
Yes,it makes sense to me. I thought it may be due to a part of the brain that may have been injured that regulates the hormones. I know that I also have developed sleep issues. I go to one end of the scale to the other. I take a sleeping aid Temazepam with 10 mg of melatonin. I sleep an average of 14 hours a day and reaches up to 18 hours a day. I then go where my last bout I was awake for 2 and half days ,then I cycle by starting to sleep a little more over the week until I get into the long sleep mode again. This cycle then repeats itself over several weeks. It may repeat within two weeks ,three weeks,etc. My cat scan was negative. My cervical MRI showed 2-4 herniated disc(doctors disagree on the number of disc involved). I currently take PT that has greatly reduced my headaches. I also have mood swings.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Suresh Heijebu 11 hours later
Brief Answer:
Sleep architecture grossly deranged.

Detailed Answer:

Hello,

I can certainly understand your concern.

I have worked through your attached query in detail.

The sleep architecture in your case is grossly deranged.

You seem to be on excessive dosage of Termazepam and Melatonin. It's advisable to maintain Nocturnal sleep duration of 6 to 8 hours only. Daytime sleep is not advisable. It's important to reduce the dosage of these sedative medications after discussing with your primary care physician. With dose reduction sleep architecture improves.

With regards to mood swings as earlier stared tablet Paroxiteine will be if great help. Please check with your physician if he shares my view and if can prescribe this medication to you.

Herniated disc disease in the cervical spine require Neurosurgical consultation to decide on the need for surgical intervention if any for permanent amelioration of symptoms.

Post your further queries if any.

Thank you.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Kampana
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Follow up: Dr. Suresh Heijebu 35 hours later
I just came from seeing the nuerologist. I explained to him of a "cycling". He said I diagnosed myself. He said I needed to go to a psychiatrist because I am bi-polar and this is why I am having sleep problems. Everything he says makes sence to me but I am somewhat surprised. He said Presently you are manic....talking,talking... He said that is why I can go without sleep one time and then I "crash". My question, I feel that this is related to my TBI. When I researched it ,I read that TBI can indeed cause mental disorders i.e. bi-polar.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Suresh Heijebu 10 hours later
Brief Answer:
MRI brain is required at the earliest.

Detailed Answer:

Hello,

I can certainly understand your concern.

The possibility of a bipolar disorder following TBI is very uncommon even though such a possibility exists.

Hence it's advisable to get an MRI SCAN OF BRAIN to rule out organic brain damage before considering the diagnosis of BIPOLAR DISORDER.

Likewise, it's advisable to consult a psychiatrist in person. A definitive diagnosis of BIPOLAR DISORDER can be made only if it's diagnostic criteria are met. These are evaluated scientifically by a psychiatrist.

Post your further queries if any.

Thank you.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Kampana
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Follow up: Dr. Suresh Heijebu 11 days later
Another question. I have had an MRI of my neck and it shows 2-4 herniated disc. (Two doctors). One says two ,the other says 4. I was hit up front by a vehicle who crossed over into my XXXXXXX I was diagnosed with whiplash,concussion,TMJand other injuries. My speed,at time of impact was 51mph in a 55mph zone. Can my herniated disc in my neck affect my lower back and hip. Can I be restored to my pre-accident state?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Suresh Heijebu 4 hours later
Brief Answer:
The higher the spine injury, the greater is the damage.

Detailed Answer:

Hello,

I can certainly understand your concern.

I have worked through your attached query in detail.

Injury to the cervical spine can certainly affect the lower back as well since the nervous structures pass from the brain, down the spine through the cervical cord.

The higher the spine injury, the greater is the damage.

The degree of recovery (reaching the premorbid levels) depends on the degree of cord compression caused by disc herniation.

I can guide you thoroughly once I can have a look at your MRI SCAN OF SPINE report. I request you to upload it for accurate assessment and guidance.

Minor herniations recover completely in most cases, where severe cord compression may require surgical intervention ( decompression procedure) to attain significant benefit.

Hope this helps.

Thank you.

Regards,
Dr. Suresh Heijebu, General & Family Physician


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Nagamani Ng
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