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What causes pressure in forehead with family history of alzheimer's disease?

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Neurologist
Practicing since : 1988
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I have several siblings with alzheimers. I am 74 and have been feeling some pressure in my forehead . Is this a symptom of alzheimers? I also have some sinus pressure
I mentioned feeling pressure in my forehead. I also feel pressure in what feels like other parts of my brain.
Is there genetic pre-disposition? Do my chances of Alzheimer's disease increase because of my family history?
Posted Wed, 6 Aug 2014 in Headache and Migraines
 
 
Answered by Dr. Dariush Saghafi 1 hour later
Brief Answer:
Forehead pressure sensation is not symptom of Alz.

Detailed Answer:
Good afternoon Ms. XXXXXXX My name is Dr. Saghafi and I am happy to answer your questions on Alzheimer's disease since as a neurologist I am quite familiar with this unfortunate neurological process. And I am very sorry to hear that several of your siblings have acquired this enigmatic problem.

I will place your questions down as you've asked them and answer each one so as to make the process as efficient as possible.

1. I am 74 and have been feeling some pressure in my forehead . Is this a symptom of Alzheimer's? I also have some sinus pressure.

>>>>Pressure in the forehead or in the sinuses is NOT any form of symptom related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease or dementia in general for that matter. I might suggest that you have your primary doctor evaluate you for this forehead pressure as either being sinus related or even possibly headache related though in either case they don't sound severe.

2. I mentioned feeling pressure in my forehead. I also feel pressure in what feels like other parts of my brain.

>>>>Again, your description of "pressure" over other parts of your head or "brain" as you put it makes me think first and foremost of headaches as opposed to any form of dementia such as Alzheimer's.

3. Is there genetic pre-disposition? Do my chances of Alzheimer's disease increase because of my family history?

>>>>Though I would love to find some way of stretching the truth on this question you've put it in a very direct way and so I have no choice but be open with you and say that in fact, there is a genetic pre-disposition to acquiring Alzheimer's disease. The risk of a child is higher when a parent has the disease and so does the risk of a sibling acquiring it if any other sibling also has the problem.

HOWEVER, we have more and more information nowadays compared to any other time in medical history as to what we can do when our brains get older than 65 since that seems to be the magic number when things become more apparent related to the more clinically apparent symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease. Exercising your brain on a regular basis (and watching TV DOESN'T COUNT in the least...even if it's National Geographic!) is known to help people maintain higher qualities of lives loner than those who become entirely docile from a cognitive point of view. Also, READING BOOKS is not as great an activity as people think either UNLESS YOU ARE WILLING TO DISCUSS THE BOOK WITH SOMEONE. So, for example, joining a library book reading club would be even a stronger activity for your brain to get the most mileage on.

Since you re obviously computer literate I would HIGHLY RECOMMEND you look at and sign up for www.lumosity.com. I love playing these games myself which have been tested and designed by neuroscientists specifically with the goal of preserving a number of different mental faculties. Also, getting active with volunteering at hospitals, libraries, and even TUTORING YOUNG CHILDREN who need help with reading and MATHEMATICS is wildly successful at making your brain feel like a million bucks again.

Please don't hesitate to send me any other questions you may have on this topic and please have someone look at you for possible headaches....BUT--- please do not get convinced to take a whole lot of medication, especially if they recommend narcotics or something rather dramatic. I think a good assessment by a neurologist or headache specialist in your case would almost guarantee that if someone were to find you had headaches that they would be more careful when putting you on anything compared to non-neurologists who tend to use agents that are not very compatible with folks over age 60.

If you find that our interaction today Ms. XXXXXXX was helpful and provided you with useful advice I would greatly appreciate it if you would rate our interaction after reading this and CLOSE THE QUERY at your earliest convenience.

Many thanks for listening to this "young whippersnapper!" and don't forget:

WWW.LUMOSITY.COM. Great website!

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