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What Causes Chronic Cough After A Gall Bladder Removal Surgery?

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Posted on Fri, 3 Nov 2017
Question: I have suffered from a chronic cough for over 10+ years, I am 56, never smoked, don't drink. I had a Nissan fundelplication over 10 years ago along with removal of my gall bladder. This helped minimally. I had been prescribed just about every GERD prescription possible, with no positive results. I have been seeing a pulmonologist for the past two years. I am on an asthma inhaler and he just recently added Sympacort. He has referred me to my GI again. Even though no improvements have been made in this area. The cough gets worst odors, perfume, etc. I will usually have a coughing spell shortly after eating also, my throat feels scratchy and dry. Chewing gum will help at times, I drink a ton of water. I had a bladder sling put in in April, one week later a coughing fit caused the passing of a huge clot and loosening of my stitches. My incontinence is now worst than it was before. But no further surgery can be scheduled until the cough is under control. One thing I noticed in the past is that twice while on antibiotics the cough seemed to be less severe. I am miserable. I cannot continue on like this. My life is miserable. But no one has any answers. I'm being passed off onto the next dr.
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Answered by Dr. Michelle Gibson James (4 hours later)
Brief Answer:
different possible causes

Detailed Answer:
HI, thanks for using healthcare magic

I am sorry that you have experienced years of persistent coughing, that would be distressing to anyone.

The most common reasons for chronic cough are:(1) post nasal drip of mucus, this is the most common cause. In 1/5 of persons, the drip itself is not detected and the person presents with a cough only
The fact that odors can worsen the cough, may point to this condition.

The use of anti histamine/decongestant combination would help though it unfortunately take weeks to months to respond in some persons.
Eg benadryl d, allegra d, claritine d, zyrtec d

(2)reflux as mentioned

(3)asthma

(4)non asthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis- this is the cause of chronic cough in 13 to 33% of persons.
It is characterized by the presence of eosinophils , which is one type of white blood cell in the lung passages.
There is no obstruction of the airways like in asthma.

It is treated with course of inhaled steroids or oral steroids if the inhaled does not work. You have been using an inhaled steroid with minimal improvement but you can still consider the sputum test.

A sample of sputum would need to be examined to see if eosinophils are present.
Some persons have more than one condition causing the cough.

I hope this helps, feel free to ask any other questions
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Michelle Gibson James

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2001

Answered : 16810 Questions

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What Causes Chronic Cough After A Gall Bladder Removal Surgery?

Brief Answer: different possible causes Detailed Answer: HI, thanks for using healthcare magic I am sorry that you have experienced years of persistent coughing, that would be distressing to anyone. The most common reasons for chronic cough are:(1) post nasal drip of mucus, this is the most common cause. In 1/5 of persons, the drip itself is not detected and the person presents with a cough only The fact that odors can worsen the cough, may point to this condition. The use of anti histamine/decongestant combination would help though it unfortunately take weeks to months to respond in some persons. Eg benadryl d, allegra d, claritine d, zyrtec d (2)reflux as mentioned (3)asthma (4)non asthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis- this is the cause of chronic cough in 13 to 33% of persons. It is characterized by the presence of eosinophils , which is one type of white blood cell in the lung passages. There is no obstruction of the airways like in asthma. It is treated with course of inhaled steroids or oral steroids if the inhaled does not work. You have been using an inhaled steroid with minimal improvement but you can still consider the sputum test. A sample of sputum would need to be examined to see if eosinophils are present. Some persons have more than one condition causing the cough. I hope this helps, feel free to ask any other questions