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Is dukes c1 a late stage of colon cancer?

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Posted on Tue, 8 Jul 2014
Question: Is dukes c1 a late stage of colon cancer?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Monish De (20 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
83% alive 5 years after diagnosis.

Detailed Answer:
Hi XXXXXXX
There are five stages of colon cancer (0-4). This staging system reflects how far the cancer has spread. In general, the earlier the stage, the easier the cancer is to treat.
Stage 3, also known as stage III, used to be known as Duke's C colon cancer. Stage 3 tumors are divided into three groups, least advanced to most advanced. The least advanced is called stage 3A (formerly Duke's C1), the one in the middle is stage 3B (formerly Duke's C2), and the most advanced is stage 3C
When discovered at stage 3A, colon cancer has reached the middle layers of the colon and spread to as many as three nearby lymph nodes.
In stage 3B, cancer is present in as many as three nearby lymph nodes and has spread beyond the middle layers of the colon or has worked its way into nearby tissues or has extended through the colon wall into nearby organs (such as the bladder or ovaries) and/or stretched into the peritoneum – tissue that covers most of the organs in your abdomen.
What differentiates stage 3C colon cancer from stages 3A and 3B is the number of lymph nodes involved. If you have a stage 3 tumor and cancer is found in four or more nearby lymph nodes, it's considered stage 3C colon cancer.
Treatment for stage 3 colon cancer generally consists of a surgical resection followed by chemotherapy. In a surgical resection, a surgeon removes the part of the colon affected by the tumor and joins the remaining healthy sections together to form one long, healthy piece.
A lot of things can influence colon cancer survival rates. Stage is a major factor, but tumor location and country of residence have also been shown to impact survival. For example, tumors in the right side of the colon are often caught later because symptoms take longer to emerge, and in countries where early screening is relatively uncommon, tumors are caught later. Studies have also found that exercise may increase colon cancer survival rates.
According to the XXXXXXX Cancer Society, 83 percent of people with stage 3A colon cancer are still alive five years after their diagnosis. The survival rates for stage 3B (64 percent) and stage 3C (44 percent) are less encouraging. However, it's important to remember that survival rates are generalizations and your individual chances of survival may be quite different. Also, survival data reflects what has happened in the past. With all the new chemotherapy drugs available, it's possible that today's survival rate for stage 3 colon cancer is significantly higher.

Hope i have answered your query
Regards
DR De




Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Vinay Bhardwaj
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Monish De (18 minutes later)
What if my father does not agree to chemo? He had surgery to remove the cancer in march but keeps saying no to chemo.

The pathological finding was dukes c1 but how can he be a c
doctor
Answered by Dr. Monish De (59 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Observation

Detailed Answer:
Hi
Generally in his stage adjuvant chemotherapy is advised after surgery to kill the remaining cancer cells that may have left behind.
But If he does not agree to chemotherapy then he needs to remain in observation for recurrence.
Your doctor will probably recommend getting a history and physical exam every 3 to 6 months for the first 2 years after treatment, then every 6 months or so for the next few years.
In most cases, your doctor will recommend a colonoscopy within a year after surgery. If this is normal, it should be repeated in 3 years. If that exam is normal, then future exams should be done about every 5 years.
CT scans may be done regularly, such as once a year, for those at higher risk of recurrence, especially in the first 3 years after treatment.
Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CA 19-9 are substances found in the blood of some people with colorectal cancer. Tests for one or both of these substances are helpful for some patients. Doctors often check levels of these markers before treatment begins. If they are elevated at first and then go down to normal after surgery, they can be checked again when you come in for follow-up. If the tumor marker level goes up again, it can be a sign that the cancer has come back, and colonoscopy or imaging tests may be done to try to locate the site of recurrence. Tumor markers tend to be most useful in the first 2 years after treatment, when recurrences are most likely to occur.
If you do not have any clarifications, you can close the discussion and rate the answer. Wish you good health.
Regards
DR DE
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Vinay Bhardwaj
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Monish De (1 hour later)
We r trying to get him to agree to chemo.

How can he be a dukes c1 if 10 nodes were affected.? The final report says c1.

His cea marker was 3 in may but 4 in XXXXXXX does this inducate reoccurence or cells left behind?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Monish De (1 hour later)
Brief Answer:
Adjuvant oral chemotherapy

Detailed Answer:
Hi
If his 10 lymph nodes are affected then it is stage 3C colon cancer.
Normal CEA level in blood varies from 0 to 5 mcg/L.
As long as his CEA level is normal which is 4 in XXXXXXX u do not need to worry.
But since his 10 lymph nodes were affected and it is stage 3C colon cancer my advise would be atleast to go for 6 months of adjuvant oral chemotherapy if he is unable to tolerate injectable chemotherapy.
This will help in future recurrence.
44% patients remain alive five years after their diagnosis in case of stage 3C colon cancer.
If you do not have any clarifications, you can close the discussion and rate the answer. Wish you good health.
Regards
DR De
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Yogesh D
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Monish De (10 hours later)
How can they say it wss a c1 if 10 nodes r affected? Should it
Not be c2 then?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Monish De (25 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Dukes C3

Detailed Answer:
Hi
What differentiates stage 3C colon cancer from stages 3A and 3B is the number of lymph nodes involved. If you have a stage 3 tumor and cancer is found in four or more nearby lymph nodes, it's considered stage 3C colon cancer.
In your fathers case 10 lymph nodes are affected so he is in stage 3C colon cancer
and it can be called dukes C3 colon cancer stage .
My advise for him at this stage would be atleast to go for 6 months of adjuvant oral chemotherapy if he is unable to tolerate injectable chemotherapy.
This will help in future recurrence.
If you do not have any clarifications, you can close the discussion and rate the answer. Wish you good health.
Regards
DR De
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Prasad
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Monish De (30 minutes later)
But the pathology report saying c1? So what does this mean and how can he b c1 with 10 lymp nodes?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Monish De (27 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
oral chemotherapy

Detailed Answer:
Hi
I recommend u review your pathology slides in another diagnostic center.
If their are metastases or spread found in 10 of his lymph nodes as per your record then he is in Dukes C3 stage.
My advise for him at this stage would be atleast to go for 6 months of adjuvant oral chemotherapy if he is unable to tolerate injectable chemotherapy.
This will help in future recurrence.
If you do not have any clarifications, you can close the discussion and rate the answer. Wish you good health.
Regards
DR De
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
Answered by
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Dr. Monish De

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Practicing since :2004

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Is dukes c1 a late stage of colon cancer?

Brief Answer: 83% alive 5 years after diagnosis. Detailed Answer: Hi XXXXXXX There are five stages of colon cancer (0-4). This staging system reflects how far the cancer has spread. In general, the earlier the stage, the easier the cancer is to treat. Stage 3, also known as stage III, used to be known as Duke's C colon cancer. Stage 3 tumors are divided into three groups, least advanced to most advanced. The least advanced is called stage 3A (formerly Duke's C1), the one in the middle is stage 3B (formerly Duke's C2), and the most advanced is stage 3C When discovered at stage 3A, colon cancer has reached the middle layers of the colon and spread to as many as three nearby lymph nodes. In stage 3B, cancer is present in as many as three nearby lymph nodes and has spread beyond the middle layers of the colon or has worked its way into nearby tissues or has extended through the colon wall into nearby organs (such as the bladder or ovaries) and/or stretched into the peritoneum – tissue that covers most of the organs in your abdomen. What differentiates stage 3C colon cancer from stages 3A and 3B is the number of lymph nodes involved. If you have a stage 3 tumor and cancer is found in four or more nearby lymph nodes, it's considered stage 3C colon cancer. Treatment for stage 3 colon cancer generally consists of a surgical resection followed by chemotherapy. In a surgical resection, a surgeon removes the part of the colon affected by the tumor and joins the remaining healthy sections together to form one long, healthy piece. A lot of things can influence colon cancer survival rates. Stage is a major factor, but tumor location and country of residence have also been shown to impact survival. For example, tumors in the right side of the colon are often caught later because symptoms take longer to emerge, and in countries where early screening is relatively uncommon, tumors are caught later. Studies have also found that exercise may increase colon cancer survival rates. According to the XXXXXXX Cancer Society, 83 percent of people with stage 3A colon cancer are still alive five years after their diagnosis. The survival rates for stage 3B (64 percent) and stage 3C (44 percent) are less encouraging. However, it's important to remember that survival rates are generalizations and your individual chances of survival may be quite different. Also, survival data reflects what has happened in the past. With all the new chemotherapy drugs available, it's possible that today's survival rate for stage 3 colon cancer is significantly higher. Hope i have answered your query Regards DR De