Get your health question answered instantly from our pool of 18000+ doctors from over 80 specialties
152 Doctors Online

By proceeding, I accept the Terms and Conditions

Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

HCM Blog Instant Access to Doctors
HCM BlogQuestions Answered
HCM Blog Satisfaction

Suggest Treatment For PSC

About one year ago I was diagnosed with PSC after a year of symptoms (did not seek treatment from a hospital due to the suspicion that it was a gall bladder issue, so I changed my diet and reduced my symptoms dramatically with only a few exceptions of serious pain). The hospital staff that diagnosed me did not inform me of much at all, simply what my condition was and how it worked. I was told to eat a low fat diet and sent on my way. Later I found out that I will most likely need a liver transplant within 10-15 years, and if I do not I will die within that time period. So now I really need to ask, how often do people whom need a liver get one based on economic status, location, liver availability ect. and how long is a person expected to live based on things such as living / deceased donor, condition, age of receiver and donor.
Thu, 26 Mar 2020
Report Abuse
Gastroenterologist, Surgical 's  Response
Hi,

Regarding Liver Transplant: It is of two types one is Live donor and other is Deceased donor

Live donor in which half of liver from one person who is normal, is taken out and transplanted in the patient.
Advantages-
Liver is available immediately.
Disadvantages -
1.You have to arrange for donor and it should be your near relative preferably first degree relative and that after some paper work and completing the legal formalities.
2. Both donor and recipient undergo major surgeries and donor also have more risk of complications (although it is very safe these days but due to major surgery risk is definitely high)

Deceased Donor in which a person who is dead or brain dead is used to get full liver.
Advantages -
1. Full liver is available.
2. As donor is already dead, no risk to donor.
Disadvantage -
1. Wait list is very long as it depends on some one who died
2. It also depends that whether blood group of that person is matching with you or not.

Different hospitals and different regions have their own preferences. In some places, mainly it is Live Donor while in others, it is mainly deceased donor, but live donor is also there.
Cost - In private set-up it is quite expensive for surgery and later on for follow up investigations and treatment (which is life long), you would need a monthly expenditure plan just for this. While in Govt. set-up, it would be lesser.

Regarding 2nd part of your question - and how long is a person expected to live based on things such as living / deceased donor, condition, age of receiver and donor. The quality of life after liver transplant is excellent if everything goes well. However, there are many factors which effects the outcome both donor and recipient related. It is quite a complicated equation. It depends upon the co morbidities in recipients like heart disease, DM, Hepatits C or B, history of Alcohol or cigarette smoking etc., and quality of liver which you receive like how fatty or fibrotic it is. Any surgical related or post operative complications like rejection, blockage of blood vessels or bile vessels, any post transplant infection etc.

Hope I have answered your question. Let me know if I can assist you further.

Regards,
Dr. Parvinder Singh, Gastroenterologist, Surgical
I find this answer helpful
Disclaimer: These answers are for your information only and not intended to replace your relationship with your treating physician.
This is a short, free answer. For a more detailed, immediate answer, try our premium service [Sample answer]
Share on
 

Related questions you may be interested in


Recent questions on Organ transplantation


Loading Online Doctors....
Suggest Treatment For PSC

Hi, Regarding Liver Transplant: It is of two types one is Live donor and other is Deceased donor Live donor in which half of liver from one person who is normal, is taken out and transplanted in the patient. Advantages- Liver is available immediately. Disadvantages - 1.You have to arrange for donor and it should be your near relative preferably first degree relative and that after some paper work and completing the legal formalities. 2. Both donor and recipient undergo major surgeries and donor also have more risk of complications (although it is very safe these days but due to major surgery risk is definitely high) Deceased Donor in which a person who is dead or brain dead is used to get full liver. Advantages - 1. Full liver is available. 2. As donor is already dead, no risk to donor. Disadvantage - 1. Wait list is very long as it depends on some one who died 2. It also depends that whether blood group of that person is matching with you or not. Different hospitals and different regions have their own preferences. In some places, mainly it is Live Donor while in others, it is mainly deceased donor, but live donor is also there. Cost - In private set-up it is quite expensive for surgery and later on for follow up investigations and treatment (which is life long), you would need a monthly expenditure plan just for this. While in Govt. set-up, it would be lesser. Regarding 2nd part of your question - and how long is a person expected to live based on things such as living / deceased donor, condition, age of receiver and donor. The quality of life after liver transplant is excellent if everything goes well. However, there are many factors which effects the outcome both donor and recipient related. It is quite a complicated equation. It depends upon the co morbidities in recipients like heart disease, DM, Hepatits C or B, history of Alcohol or cigarette smoking etc., and quality of liver which you receive like how fatty or fibrotic it is. Any surgical related or post operative complications like rejection, blockage of blood vessels or bile vessels, any post transplant infection etc. Hope I have answered your question. Let me know if I can assist you further. Regards, Dr. Parvinder Singh, Gastroenterologist, Surgical