Get your Health question answered in 3 easy steps
A Doctor will be with you shortly
Ask a Doctor Now
138 Doctors are Online

Suggest treatment for lump in breast

User rating for this question
Excellent
Answered by

General Surgeon
Practicing since : 2008
Answered : 1290 Questions
Question
Hello Doctor, my wife (35) has just detected a lump in right breast (lower side). There is no pain. We are currently out of XXXXXXX and will be coming back in December this year. Our question is, can we wait till return to XXXXXXX (~ 3 months) or visit a local doctor immediately.
Posted Mon, 1 Sep 2014 in Lump
 
 
Answered by Dr. Ashish Verma 26 minutes later
Brief Answer:
any family history of cancer?

Detailed Answer:
Hi XXXXXXX

Welcome to HealthcareMagic.

If there is no family history of cancer in first degree relatives on her side (her mother or sisters) and if the lump is less than 4 cm in size and is not involving the skin or nipple, then you may wait till you return back to XXXXXXX As at her age we usually don't suspect cancer. At her age the lumps are usually benign fat condensation, known as fibroadenoma.

If any one of the above is present then you should show it to a surgeon for a clinical examination and a needle biopsy to help reach a diagnosis.

Hope i have been helpful.

Regards,
Dr. Ashish Verma
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suggest treatment for lump in breast 2 hours later
Dear Dr. XXXXXXX

Thanks indeed for your prompt advise.

Thankfully, there is no family history of cancer, lump is much smaller than 4 cm and is not on/very near nipple. However not sure if I understood "not involving the skin".

A bit more info: The lump is below the skin (feels like ~ 5 mm below). The skin above it seems normal (no wrinkles/ change in appearance). Also, it's been a year she last fed my baby (now 3 yrs old) but she still lactates a bit (which she removes by hands).

Thanks again for your timely and prompt help. It sure reduced the anxiety quite a bit.

Sincere thanks,
XXXX
 
 
Answered by Dr. Ashish Verma 4 hours later
Brief Answer:
is the skin pinchable over the lump

Detailed Answer:
Hi,

If she is able to pinch the skin overlying the lump then it means the skin is not involved.

And as she is still lactating, one more possibility is that the lump could be a galactocele (milk filled cyst). This is also a benign condition, but can complicate if it gets infected. So see a doctor if it becomes painful. Else you need not worry.

As such, as per your description, to me it looks like a benign lump only, and you can wait till you return back.

Regards,
Dr. Ashish Verma
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Suggest treatment for lump in breast 20 minutes later
Thanks again doctor.

the skin is not pinchable. Lump seems very close to the skin. So seems like visiting a local doctor may be advisable.

Sincere thanks,
XXXX
 
 
Answered by Dr. Ashish Verma 5 hours later
Brief Answer:
yes then a visit is advisible

Detailed Answer:
Hi,

If the skin is not pinchable, it means that the lump is attached to the skin. This is usually not seen in benign lumps.

So you should get it checked by a local doctor. And also get a needle biopsy of the lump. They might even ask to get a mammogram also. These all will help to reach a diagnosis. Further management will depend upon the diagnosis.

Regards,
Dr. Ashish Verma
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+

The user accepted the expert's answer

Ask a General Surgeon

© Ebix, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
All the information, content and live chat provided on the site is intended to be for informational purposes only, and not a substitute for professional or medical advice. You should always speak with your doctor before you follow anything that you read on this website. Any health question asked on this site will be visible to the people who browse this site. Hence, the user assumes the responsibility not to divulge any personally identifiable information in the question. Use of this site is subject to our Terms & Conditions
Already Rated.
Your rating:

Ask a Doctor