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Suggest treatment for fetal cardiac calcifications

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Posted on Mon, 16 Feb 2015
Question: I just had a level 2 ultrasound because my doctor thought they saw clubfoot. I was 20 weeks at the level 2 us. The doctor's said that my baby had "the most abnormal foot that he has ever saw". He said it is not club foot. The right foot is considerably larger than the left and he says it appears to be fluid filled or swollen. He is not sure what it is. He said it does have bones and toes. He also found two focal echolalia (calcium deposits on heart) and a 2-vessel cord (SUA). He has offered me amniocentesis. I have to go back for a echocardiogram in two weeks at which time I have to make a decision about the amnio. I am so scared and I cannot find any info about what my baby's abnormal foot can be. I am hoping it may be an I jury, is this a possibility? Do you have any idea what could be going on with my baby? I appreciate any help
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Answered by Dr. Diptanshu Das (1 hour later)
Brief Answer:
You should definitely go for amniocentesis

Detailed Answer:
Thanks for asking on HealthcareMagic.

I am really sorry to know that there are things that are going not-so-well with your still unborn baby. Your unborn baby seems to have a Fetal cardiac calcifications (you probably got the term wrong) which often indicate serious issues with the functioning of the heart. It is one of 'Soft markers' (not a direct fetal structural abnormality) and could be associated with some very bad things that could negatively affect your baby, things that could result your baby to be 'specially-abled'. The fact that there could be another condition called Hydrops fetalis, affecting the foot of the baby, makes things even more complicated. It could result from the heart not functioning properly and could be related. Both the above conditions could be result of some genetic abnormality in the fetus. It is not a result of any injury.

It is no use being presumptive and your doctor has done the right thing by suggesting amniocentesis which would help in identifying if the child really has a possibility of having such a condition. You should definitely get the amniocentesis done. It is a not-so-risky procedure where a simple ultrasoud guided injection would collect the fetal cells that are floating in the fluid that surrounds the baby inside the uterus. It is after analyzing those cells that the doctor would be able to comment of what your child has and can discuss the options accordingly. Depending on the results, you should neutrally consider if you really want to continue the pregnancy as the grave outcome could result in lifelong disabilities if the child is finally born.

I understand that the situation is challenging but still would request you not to panic, although there are definite reasons to be worried. Things are as they come and we need to accept them and deal with them in the light of the situation and not by letting emotions block your mind. You would have to be really brave and your doctor would definitely guide you properly and please follow the instructions that he gives and discusses with you. Reading the following scientific articles might be relevant to you:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/uog.2689/pdf
http://www.fetalsono.com/teachfiles/heartpap.lasso
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/0000
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007308.htm
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/974571-workup

Hoping for a favorable outcome.

Regards
Dr. Diptanshu Das
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Yogesh D
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Follow up: Dr. Diptanshu Das (1 hour later)
Is there any chance that the baby may not be severely disabled?
Doesn't the hydrops details have to have fluid accumulation in two or more body parts? The ultrasound only showed fluid accumulation in the foot?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Diptanshu Das (4 hours later)
Brief Answer:
Amniocentesis will make things clearer

Detailed Answer:
Thanks for writing back.

Unless I get to see the ultrasound directly, it is really hard for me to comment. I have just indicated the possibilities. The picture would be clearer once you get the amniocentesis done. Once the results of the amniocentesis come, your doctor would be able to discuss the conditions that may occur in such genetic association (if any). I would request you to be patient and wait for the answers till then. There is definitely a chance that everything would be fine and the test reports come favorable.

Hope that helps.

Regards
Dr. Diptanshu Das
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Bhagyalaxmi Nalaparaju
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Dr. Diptanshu Das

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Practicing since :2005

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Suggest treatment for fetal cardiac calcifications

Brief Answer: You should definitely go for amniocentesis Detailed Answer: Thanks for asking on HealthcareMagic. I am really sorry to know that there are things that are going not-so-well with your still unborn baby. Your unborn baby seems to have a Fetal cardiac calcifications (you probably got the term wrong) which often indicate serious issues with the functioning of the heart. It is one of 'Soft markers' (not a direct fetal structural abnormality) and could be associated with some very bad things that could negatively affect your baby, things that could result your baby to be 'specially-abled'. The fact that there could be another condition called Hydrops fetalis, affecting the foot of the baby, makes things even more complicated. It could result from the heart not functioning properly and could be related. Both the above conditions could be result of some genetic abnormality in the fetus. It is not a result of any injury. It is no use being presumptive and your doctor has done the right thing by suggesting amniocentesis which would help in identifying if the child really has a possibility of having such a condition. You should definitely get the amniocentesis done. It is a not-so-risky procedure where a simple ultrasoud guided injection would collect the fetal cells that are floating in the fluid that surrounds the baby inside the uterus. It is after analyzing those cells that the doctor would be able to comment of what your child has and can discuss the options accordingly. Depending on the results, you should neutrally consider if you really want to continue the pregnancy as the grave outcome could result in lifelong disabilities if the child is finally born. I understand that the situation is challenging but still would request you not to panic, although there are definite reasons to be worried. Things are as they come and we need to accept them and deal with them in the light of the situation and not by letting emotions block your mind. You would have to be really brave and your doctor would definitely guide you properly and please follow the instructions that he gives and discusses with you. Reading the following scientific articles might be relevant to you: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/uog.2689/pdf http://www.fetalsono.com/teachfiles/heartpap.lasso http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/0000 http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007308.htm http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/974571-workup Hoping for a favorable outcome. Regards Dr. Diptanshu Das