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Liked by dogs. Have broken skin. Taken T.T and Vaxirab injection. Should I take rabies shot also?

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Internal Medicine Specialist
Practicing since : 2005
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i have been licked on three of my fingers by a stray dog when i was walking down the street. I always used to have broken skin in all most all my fingers. It licked exactly there in all my three fingers. I been to a doctor. They gave me T.T and Vaxirab injection. Is this enough or do i have to take rabies immunogolulin shots too. How would they inject me on my all three fingers?
Posted Wed, 5 Jun 2013 in General Health
 
 
Answered by Dr. Omer 1 hour later
Hi ,

Thanks for your question.

My name is Dr Omer and I am here to help you today with your question. I will be happy to assist you with your follow up questions also. I am sorry to hear about your problem.

As you have told that you had been licked by a stray dog, I hope unprovoked, with damaged skin, you are placed in category 2 and you need the following according to latest guidelines
1.wound cleaning
2.rabies immunoglobulin 20-40 iu/kg(passive immunity)
3.rabies vaccine 0,3,7,14,28(active immunity)
Broken skin is always an issue and I would recommend to get immunoglobulin no later than 7 days of this incident.

Now coming to second part of the question how to inject immunoglobulin, Either you can inject it with lignocaine around the fingers ( all three) or it can be injected at the base of the fingers meaning palm covering all three finger.

Or

Have the complete dose of immunoglobulin at your buttock , it is equally effective according to latest guidelines "Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) guidelines of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)".

As this world has no treatment of active rabies.

I wish you good luck that you get well soon, if you have any question, please ask.

Take care,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Liked by dogs. Have broken skin. Taken T.T and Vaxirab injection. Should I take rabies shot also? 4 days later
Now i have got hrig as well on three of my fingers. but they were not able to inject everything into my fingers rest were injected into deltoid muscles of my right shoulder thats where they had given me my first vaccine(right deltoid muscle) as instructed in the booklet of the hrig. but now i read somewhere that hrig cannot be given at the same site of the first administered vaccine.

1. first vaccine was given to me on my right arm day 0.
2. second vaccine was given to me on my left arm day 3.
3. hrig was administered intramusculary on my right arm again.

Is this alright? What usually happens when hrig is given at the same place of vaccine? Is there any negative effect.

correction in 3rd point:- rest of hrig was given to intramuscularly on my right arm where the first vaccine was given. first vaccine was given in day 0 and hrig was given to me in 04 day on the same muscle on the same arm.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Omer 1 hour later
Hello,

I am really happy that you started your anti rabies course as soon as possible.

It is said that rabies immunoglobulin (RIG ) should always be given in a different syringe from the vaccine, and at a different intramuscular site, such as the deltoid muscle opposite the vaccine dose or the anterior thigh but can be given on the same side if the difference of injection is >>48 hrs.

Vaccines or immunoglobulins absorb more fast approx 48 hrs), nothing will happen and you will get all of vaccine and immunoglobulin in your body.And you will be fully immunized against rabies.


As much of the RIG dose as is anatomically feasible should be infiltrated in the area around and in the wounds. Any remaining dose should be given intramuscularly. If there is no obvious wound, the large volume of RIG is best administered into the gluteal muscle. Our main objective is to get as much as passive and active immunity into your body from anywhere.
(fingers, deltoids,gluteal region)


Just complete your course and keep on observing yourself for flu , cough , fever, injection site redness and every thing will be fine.

Keep yourself safe from dog bite in future.

Hope, I was helpful to you in most humble way.


Take care,
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Liked by dogs. Have broken skin. Taken T.T and Vaxirab injection. Should I take rabies shot also? 8 minutes later
Thanks for the reply. I am glad to know that i doing things right.

But what do you mean by this "Just complete your course and keep on observing yourself for flu , cough , fever, injection site redness and every thing will be fine"?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Omer 14 hours later
Hello jaybaskar

Thank you for understanding me.

What I meant is that the rabies injection, rabies immunoglobulins are known as foreign agents to the body, and body sometimes reacts with flu, fever, or cough.

But, at the same time I would say today's rabies injections are so purified by different companies that they easily remove all those side effects of these injections. But it may happen in 1 in 10,000 people. So just don't worry about these reactions as you are in day 5-6.

Stay happy and safe
Happy to answer your questions

If you are satisfied by services do write a review, if possible

Take care
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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