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Carotid artery screening,low blood pressure,sinus bradycardia,left atrial abnormality,anteroseptal myocardial damage

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i had a carotid artery screening and it came back with 1-14% plaque in Right and 15-39% in left. I am normal weight, i exercise and have really low blood pressure. They also said I have sinus Bradycardia with a left atrial abnormality QRS(T) contour abnormality and cannot rule out anteroseptal myocardial damage. I know I need to see my doctor but she is out of town until end of August. What does all of this mean?
Posted Sun, 29 Apr 2012 in Hypertension and Heart Disease
 
 
Answered by Dr. Puneet Maheshwari 46 minutes later
Hi, thanks for the query,

Well, I have gone through your question minutely. Now let me tell you about your problem.

There are 4 coronary arteries which supply blood to the heart, out of these four arteries you have blockage in two of them, that is right and left coronary artery, and the blockage is 14 % and 39 % respectively.

Any blockage less than 30 % is insignificant, and requires no intervention. In your case it is 40 % in left coronary artery, so you will have to take certain precautions like---

1- TAKE FAT FREE DIET.
2-Avoid excessive sugar intake.
3-regular brisk walking atleast 20 minutes.

Sinus bradycardia means that your heart rate is less than 72, and the reason for this is the SA node, the stimulating organ of the body, is working slow.

For this you will have to take some stimulants, and the regular exercises will wrok definitely in this condition.

Antroseptal damage signifies previous silent MI, but it is not possible at this blockage.

Now what you will have to do--

1- Try to consult a cardiologist as soon as possible.
2- Follow the above mentioned instructions.

Dont worry, you will be all rite.

Hope this will help you and I am ready for future follow ups( if any).

REGARDS.
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Follow-up: Carotid artery screening,low blood pressure,sinus bradycardia,left atrial abnormality,anteroseptal myocardial damage 2 hours later
Hi,

The blockage was not my coronary artery but my carotid artery. How would this effect your answer?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Puneet Maheshwari 17 hours later
Hi again,

I apologize for the mistake.

Your both carotids has a minute percentage of blockage, it is far less XXXXXXX in comparison to coronary artery blockage(which is a very common condition).

At present no active intervention is required, just limit fat intake and go for regular follow up with your doctor.

Please relax and don't worry regarding this.

Hope this answers your query.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Carotid artery screening,low blood pressure,sinus bradycardia,left atrial abnormality,anteroseptal myocardial damage 1 hour later
Thank you so much. One final question, what does it mean when the interpretation on the report says "left atrial abnormality QRS(T) contour abnormality and cannot rule out anteroseptal myocardial damage"?

Thanks!
 
 
Answered by Dr. Puneet Maheshwari 3 hours later
Hi again,

The QRS complex is the part of the waveform that reflects the contraction of the ventricles -the main pumping chambers of the heart.

An abnormality in its shape (contour) MAY indicate damage to some part of the heart's muscle wall--but can also be due to temporary changes in your blood sodium - potassium levels etc. It's not possible to tell without examining the actual ECG completely.

Consistent with anteroseptal myocardial damage: tentatively confirms the doctor's diagnosis of partial myocardial (heart muscle) damage.

Testing for serum calcium, sodium, potassium and echocardiogram will be helpful to confirm the diagnosis. You may get these done under guidance of your primary care provider.

Hope this will help you.

Wish you good health.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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