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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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Coronary heart disease and social security disability

would coronary heart disease qualify a person for social security disability?
Sat, 19 Dec 2009
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Depending on the degree to which it affects your ability to work at what every your usual line of work is, yes or no. If you are restricted enough that you can't work, then yes. If not, no. The first answer is absolutely wrong. The only way to find out is to apply for the disability. If you get rejected you can appeal a number of times, as with Supplementary Security Income. When you are told that you have no more appeals, then ask for arbitration with a judge. Whatever the judge decides is binding. If the judge rules that you are disabled, you'll receive payments from the time you filed if you don't let any time limits expire. The same pretty much holds true for SSI. If you don't qualify for Social Security, you might try SSI. My wife received Social Security Benefits for a couple of years until she qualified for her regular Social Security pension. I received SSI until I qualified for my Social Security pension also. Talk to an attorney who specializes in Social Security claims and get a legal opinion. If the attorney takes your case, you'll have to pay about 25% of your benefits owed to you. If you don't win the case, the attorney will charge you nothing.
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Coronary heart disease and social security disability

Depending on the degree to which it affects your ability to work at what every your usual line of work is, yes or no. If you are restricted enough that you can t work, then yes. If not, no. The first answer is absolutely wrong. The only way to find out is to apply for the disability. If you get rejected you can appeal a number of times, as with Supplementary Security Income. When you are told that you have no more appeals, then ask for arbitration with a judge. Whatever the judge decides is binding. If the judge rules that you are disabled, you ll receive payments from the time you filed if you don t let any time limits expire. The same pretty much holds true for SSI. If you don t qualify for Social Security, you might try SSI. My wife received Social Security Benefits for a couple of years until she qualified for her regular Social Security pension. I received SSI until I qualified for my Social Security pension also. Talk to an attorney who specializes in Social Security claims and get a legal opinion. If the attorney takes your case, you ll have to pay about 25% of your benefits owed to you. If you don t win the case, the attorney will charge you nothing.