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What does this gallbladder report regarding stomach pain indicate?

DOCTOR OF THE MONTH - Sep 2014
Sep 2014
User rating for this question
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Answered by

General & Family Physician
Practicing since : 2004
Answered : 2344 Questions
Question
I recently went in for a check up due to a sharp stomach pain out of no where... which lasted for about two consecutive days.
After all of the tests was done this is what the report says: I want to understand from expert what are the interpretation what I need to know and things like that. I'm worried.
This is the report" The gallbladder is collapsed. Multiples echogenic calculi are identified. The gallbladder wall measured 1.4mm in thickness. The common bile duct measures 7.4 mm in diameter.There is no fluid to the gallbladder fossa.Patient did not have a positive XXXXXXX sign"

Impression:
1. without ultrasound evidence of acute cholecystitis
2. Mild dilatation of the common bile duct may reflect prior stone passage.
3. The reminder of the examination is normal
Posted Sun, 24 Aug 2014 in Liver and Gall Bladder
 
 
Answered by Dr. Ganesh 4 hours later
Brief Answer:
Cholelithiasis / CBD obstruction.

Detailed Answer:
Welcome to health care magic.
Iam Dr. Ganesh.

1.Your report say that there are few ( multiple echogenic foci )calculi / stones in your
gall bladder and CBD (common bile duct) is mildly dilated with collapse state of the gall bladder. Wall thickness is generally not considered in collapsed state.

2.It would have been better if you had your scan on empty stomach - which will cause gall bladder to destined and better visualisation.

3.The CBD gets dilated when a calculus gets on the way and causes obstruction or any other obstructive cause - which is what causing pain to you.

4.There are stones but there is no inflammation - as XXXXXXX sign negative and ultrasound also not found any collection around the gall bladder.

5.In tis case the treatment of choice in a symptomatic gall bladder calculi ( cholelithiasis) is Cholecystectomy ( removal of gall bladder) after treating symptoms.

Hope i have answered your query.
if any thing to ask, do not hesitate.
Thanks for approaching to health care magic.
Dr. Ganesh
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: What does this gallbladder report regarding stomach pain indicate? 10 hours later
2.It would have been better if you had your scan on empty stomach - which will cause gall bladder to destined and better visualisation.

Reply: Yes I had the ultrasound done on empty stomach, I was instructed not to eat anything or drink after mid night prior to the exam and I did.


5.In tis case the treatment of choice in a symptomatic gall bladder calculi ( cholelithiasis) is Cholecystectomy ( removal of gall bladder) after treating symptoms.

Reply:
How soon is it best to get the GB remove? I'm experiencing night sweat occasionally which I'm worried. My PA should refer me to see a Surgeon soon .
what is your opion ?

is this kind of surgery critical that I should be worried and how is it done ?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Ganesh 5 hours later
Brief Answer:
Nowadays its very simple procedure.

Detailed Answer:
Thank you for your query.

1. Since you are symptomatic i recommend to get the operation done. Finally by examining your present condition your surgeon will decide what and when to do.

2.Previously it used to be open operation, but nowadays it is done through laparoscopic procedure, in which there will be 3-4 incisions of 1-1.5cm, generally discharged after 1-2days post operation.

3.As soon as you get referred, your surgeon will do some preoperative tests and proceed for operation. Do not worry it going to be normal.

4. Coming to your ultrasound - what i meant was, it will be better seen on empty stomach, If that precaution was taken and still like that, nothing can be done. don't worry about it.

Hope it will help you, If any thing to ask, do not hesitate.
wish you good health.
thank you.
Dr. Ganesh.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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