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What are the heart rate and BP guidelines for normalcy ?

What are the heart rate and blood pressure guidelines for normalcy? I recently had a bp of 220/119 with a heart rate of 136. The ER seemed concerned but did not do anything much. I am waiting for a Dr. appt with my GP.
Asked On : Thu, 17 Dec 2009
Answers:  3 Views:  533
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  User's Response
What is your b/p normally? Did you ever find out the cause of your high b/p? What did the ER do for your b/p? Did a ER doctor give you any kind of prescription? Does your family have a history of hypertension? Have you ever had a abnormal high b/p? There are different kinds of risk factors that cause a rise in b/p, such as stress, weight, diet, kidney problems, and the list could go on and on, but being there is not very much information provided its hard to assess. Keep in mind everyone's body is different, including what some people consider the 'norm' b/p. The 120/80 is a just a average b/p reading, doesn't mean its normal for you. However the concern with rising b/p is it puts you @ risk for strokes, heart attack, kidney problems, because high blood pressure, puts pressure on all your vital organs (heart, liver, brain, and especially the kidneys) and causes damage to them. I want to give you an example of how b/p works, using the b/p you had in the ER which was 220/119. The 220 represents the systolic pressure, and the bottom number represents the diastolic pressure. The systolic pressure of 220 is the amount of force (pressure) you are pushing against your arteries, and to your organs (the heart, kidneys, etc). The diastolic pressure of 119 tells the LEAST amount of pressure that was on your arteries when your heart was relaxing. Think of this as a pump when you squeeze something, then let go release pressure, and then squeeze again. Basically there was little time for your heart to relax in between pumping blood, because of the abnormally high b/p. That may explain why your heart rate was accelerated, but there can also be other factors that can cause that to occur. I assume that ER at least got that under control, before you were released and sent back home. I would hope so. B/P is considered high when b/p reaches 140/90, then you are considered hypertensive (high) and anything below 90/60 is considered hypotensive (low). So if you are looking for something in the 'norm' anything between those ranges would be considered that, but keep in mind everyone is different, and you should ask the doctor what is right for you.
Answered: Thu, 17 Dec 2009
  User's Response
hi normal blood pressure reading is-systolic-90 to 119,diastolic-60 to79.heart rate is 60 to 80 beats per minute.yours is high BP and tachycardia.
Answered: Mon, 8 Aug 2011
  User's Response

I am a 58 year old white male. I am diagnosed as Bipolar (I think it's border line personality disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder. I take epival( Nova-Divalproex 500 ms..2 tablets twice a day)and lamactil ( Novo-Lamotrigine 150 mg..1 tablet twice a day. I am also diabetic and take Metformine 500mg...2 tablets twice a day. I have not slept  more then 3 or 4 hours in three days, eating is difficult it makes me nauseous and my heart rate is about 89/min. I do not know what my blood pressure is. It is very late here and I hope to see my Psyc. tomorrow if I can get in. I am very uncomfortable and my anxiety is high. Should I be worried now or can wait till tomorrow PM. 

Answered: Mon, 19 Apr 2010
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