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Does a gout patient have increased PSA level?

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General & Family Physician
Practicing since : 2005
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Yes, hi! Can a man with gout have a slightly increased PSA level?
Posted Wed, 11 Apr 2012 in Cancer
Follow-up: Does a gout patient have increased PSA level? 4 minutes later
His level in one of his blood tests here in Australia came back at 10.5
 
 
Answered by Dr. Radhika 38 minutes later
Hi,
Thanks for the query.

A PSA (prostate specific antigen) level more than 10, increases the chance of having prostate Malignancy, but there could be various other causes for rise in PSA levels.

Neither gout or the medications used to treat will affect PSA levels. The most common cause of a fluctuating PSA level is inflammation in the prostate gland, but it is possible also to have benign enlargement.

There are several factors that can also elevate the PSA, such as:

1. Ejaculation (no ejaculation at least two days prior to test).

2. PSA levels can naturally increase with age.

3. Inflammation of the prostate gland.

4. Non cancerous enlargement of the prostate.

An isolated rise of the PSA, (even if the rise exceeds the “safe” velocities) may not always be reason for alarm, but most agree that three successive PSA determinations will be needed before confirming.

I would advise you to consult a Urologist, and if the PSA does not return to baseline, I would advise a prostate biopsy.

Hope I have answered your query. I will be available for follow up queries if any.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Does a gout patient have increased PSA level? 28 minutes later
He has just started Dialysis within the last 3 months, and has had certain infections (colds, etc) for which he has had to be on antibiotics. Before the dialysis, he was constantly taking Lasix to make him go to the toilet to get rid of all excess fluid (anywhere up to 4 litres a sitting) as his kidneys were not doing this for him, therefore hence why the dialysis started.

His bloods said that it was 10.5 and could be a possible result from and infection, urinary issues and could possibly be Prostalitis (unsure of spelling) etc etc etc. due to what he is doing with dialysis and all his other blood levels said they were all good, apart from some that showed that he had some sort of an infection but was getting better. Could this be the infection that is causing the PSA to rise and how does he get this down?

Also i have been trying to find a scale for the PSA Reading Levels
ie.
PSA <0.1 is good
PSA < 4.4 is normal
etc.
and what is the maximum the PSA can go up to?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Radhika 1 hour later
Hi,
Thanks for the follow up.

The normal levels for his age will be 0 to 5.3.

Virtually anything that irritates the prostate will cause the PSA (prostate specific antigen) to rise, at least temporarily.

Prostatitis is a condition where the prostate becomes inflamed due to an infection or another cause. Most cases of this condition are acute, or come and go away again over a short period of time, but some men also can have chronic prostatitis.
This condition, if due to a bacterial infection, can be treated with antibiotics.

Once his infection levels go down and he is appropriately treated with antibiotics, you could go for a repeat PSA level test.

If it still high then you could do biopsy.

Wishing you good health.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Does a gout patient have increased PSA level? 45 minutes later
Do you think and your professional opinion would be all this is (infection) as that is what the report said that it is more likely to be prostatitis hyperplasia (could you explain what this is) Its just that with all the Dr's and Blood Tests, they have managed to slip up and not mention this to us (is that because they have overlooked it, or is this a common occurrence in Dialysis Patients and no need to mention it as it will go down) unsure....I am sure if it was a major issue, they would have told us. We were just reading over our results and came across them and thought that it wasn't right, so now we are here just asking you a few questions so we can get a clearer idea.

Hoping you can help
Am waiting patiently for your response
Follow-up: Does a gout patient have increased PSA level? 1 hour later
Hello
Follow-up: Does a gout patient have increased PSA level? 5 hours later
Do you think and your professional opinion would be all this is (infection) as that is what the report said that it is more likely to be prostatitis hyperplasia (could you explain what this is) Its just that with all the Dr's and Blood Tests, they have managed to slip up and not mention this to us (is that because they have overlooked it, or is this a common occurrence in Dialysis Patients and no need to mention it as it will go down) unsure....I am sure if it was a major issue, they would have told us. We were just reading over our results and came across them and thought that it wasn't right, so now we are here just asking you a few questions so we can get a clearer idea.

Hoping you can help
Am waiting patiently for your response
 
 
Answered by Dr. Radhika 10 hours later
Hi,

Thanks for the follow up and I am sorry for a delayed reply as I had a busy day.

I am sure they would have informed you if it was any sort of malignancy. So do not worry.

Studies regarding the link of patients with kidney disease and rise in PSA(prostate specific antigen) levels is still in progress. Studies suggests that patients on dialysis does not have significant impact on total PSA levels.

I just want to provide more information for your doubts about BPH (Benign Prostate Enlargment) a common thing at this age. Here it goes.

Those individuals with ab­normal values of PSA either had or were at risk to develop prostatic disease.

BPH (also referred to as benign prostatic hypertrophy) is a condition in which the prostate gland becomes very enlarged and may cause problems associated with urination. BPH can raise PSA (prostate-specific antigen) levels two to three times higher than the normal level.

Prostate continues to grow during most of a man's life, the enlargement doesn't usually cause problems until late in life. BPH rarely causes symptoms before age 40, but more than half of men in their sixties and as many as 90 percent in their seventies and eighties have some symptoms of BPH such as:

A hesitant, interrupted, weak stream,urgency and leaking or dribbling,more frequent urination, especially at night.

The following tests can help determine if he is suffering from Benign prostatic hyperplasia.
Digital Rectal Examination (DRE), Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Repeat Blood Test, Rectal Ultrasound and Prostate Biopsy, Urine Flow Study, Cystoscopy. All these tests have no significance and not mandatory if the treating doctor finds the PSA levels are normal to his condition. If any suspicion he would repeat PSA first.

Hope I have answered your query.

Wishing you good health.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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