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Blood test done for child. Recovering from infection. Need for concern with test results?

DOCTOR OF THE MONTH - Feb 2013
Feb 2013
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Hi, my 6 and a half year old son has just done his blood test 2 days ago and the results today show his WCC is 14.2 (neutrophils 8.5, monocytes 1.1, eosinophils 0.7) and platelets is 495 with ESR 34.
He just has infection last week but is now recovering. Should I be concerned with the above results? My doctor told me that all the above is due to his infection. Is it true? Thanks.
Posted Sun, 7 Apr 2013 in Child Health
 
 
Answered by Dr. E Venkata Ramana 19 minutes later
Hi,

Thank you for your query on Healthcare Magic.

The WBC count and ESR is slightly on higher side.

ESR is a nonspeicfic test and in may increase in any infection.

The WBC count is increased in bacterial infections.

As your doctor said, these changes are due to his infection and nothing to worry as your child is now recovering.

With the treatment of his infection, these changes will become normal.

So stop worrying and follow your doctor treatment advise.

Hope I have answered your query, if you have any clarification please let me know.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Blood test done for child. Recovering from infection. Need for concern with test results? 5 minutes later
Thanks so much for your answers.
Would I need to be concerned with the high platelets? Or is it part of his infection?
 
 
Answered by Dr. E Venkata Ramana 5 minutes later
Hi,

Thank you for getting back.

Nothing to worry about the slightly higher platelet count.

Platelets also will increase in some infections.

Once the infection has been treated things will get corrected.

Hope I have answered your query, if you have any clarification please let me know.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Blood test done for child. Recovering from infection. Need for concern with test results? 12 minutes later

Thanks so much for your prompt answer.

One last question, how long after the infection should these increases on blood count last for?

My son has been off fever since 2 days ago.

Thanks and this should be my last question.
 
 
Answered by Dr. E Venkata Ramana 1 hour later
Hi,

Thank you for getting back.

Under normal circumstances an abnormal white blood cell count will return to pre-infection levels after the infection has run its course.

When the white blood count returns to normal levels, it is typically a sign that the illness is ending.

Once the infection is treated effectively with medication and when the child becomes asymtomatic without the the source of any infection, the blood count will be normal.

We can say an average of 3 to 5 days in general but may vary depending on the type of infection and individual immune response.

But in routine infections, repitition of the blood test may not required to look for normalisation of values.

Hope I have answered your queries upto your satisfaction.

If you don't have any clarification, you can close the session and I request you to kindly rate my answer to advise in a better way in future.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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