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Spreading, itchy patch on skin near eyebrow, white scaling when scratched. Any ideas?

I have developed a sliightly itchy patch on my skin near the brow and actually even in the eye brow itself it is starting to spread... when i scratch it it has a white scaling. It started like two days back.i didnot notice when it was starting i just realised when it had already come but all i remember is that the part had been abit itchy some time before it developed
Asked On : Thu, 10 Oct 2013
Answers:  1 Views:  22
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Infectious Diseases Specialist 's  Response
Hi,
Welcome to HCM.
Itchy patches on face are usually superficial fungal infections called as taenia infection. This infection is caused by dermatophytes (fungi) which usually affect the skin , hair and nails. Do not scratch the patch as you might cause spread of it. Apply antifungal cream (Zole) over the patch for two weeks. If it does not reduce get a dermatologist opinion. Thanks.
Answered: Thu, 10 Oct 2013
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