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Elevated PSA levels. Normal rectal biopsy. Took antibiotics. What else should I do?

i have had an elevated psa (4-9 total psa) over the last 5 years. i have had 4 ultrasound guided rectal biopsy's and all were negative. all DRE's were negative. i just completed a 30 days of antibiotics and had my blood drawn today and am waiting for results. My uro told me i may consider a saturation biopsy next, if psa does not go down. Should i have waited longer to get my blood drawn after finishing the antibiotics? I had blood drawn the day after finishing the 30 day regiment of antibiotics.
Asked On : Tue, 16 Apr 2013
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Psychiatrist 's  Response
Jun 2013
Hi there ~

I understand your concerns. However having your blood drawn the day after finishing the regimen of antibiotics does not have anything to do with the fact that your PSA levels had not gone down. If a man who has no symptoms of prostate cancer chooses to undergo prostate cancer screening and is found to have an elevated PSA level, the doctor may recommend another PSA test to confirm the original finding. If the PSA level is still high, the doctor may recommend that the man continue with PSA tests and DREs at regular intervals to watch for any changes over time. If a man’s PSA level continues to rise or if a suspicious lump is detected during a DRE, the doctor may recommend additional tests to determine the nature of the problem, such as the one you have had and have been treated for the same. A urine test may be recommended to check for a urinary tract infection. The doctor may also recommend imaging tests, such as a transrectal ultrasound, x-rays, or cystoscopy. If prostate cancer is suspected, the doctor will recommend a prostate biopsy. During this procedure, multiple samples of prostate tissue are collected by inserting hollow needles into the prostate and then withdrawing them. Most often, the needles are inserted through the wall of the rectum (transrectal biopsy); however, the needles may also be inserted through the skin between the scrotum and the anus (transperineal biopsy). A pathologist then examines the collected tissue under a microscope. The doctor may use ultrasound to view the prostate during the biopsy, but ultrasound cannot be used alone to diagnose prostate cancer. I hope this information helps relieve your anxiety.

Take care and have a lovely day!
Answered: Thu, 13 Jun 2013
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