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Unprotected sex. Negative for HIV ELISA test. How accurate is this test?

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General & Family Physician
Practicing since : 1978
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I got a HIV Elisa test at 5 weeks and was negative ( result was 0.043 , cut off was .13 ) , how accurate is this reading. I had protected Sex - 5 weeks ago and I think the condom was OK , but I am not sure .Actually I used 2 condoms during that time . The persons HIV status is Unknown . What next step should I take .
Posted Tue, 22 May 2012 in HIV and AIDS
 
 
Answered by Dr. Pavan Kumar Gupta 2 hours later
Hello and thanks for query.
HIV Elisa test is based on finding antibodies against HIV infection.
It takes some time called as WINDOW PERIOD for these antibodies to form in sufficient quantity and render this test positive.
Ideally this period is maximum up to 3 months.
So you must get HIV Elisa test repeated at 3 months from your sex date.
If the test is negative at 3 months and you didn't have any other unprotected sex during this period,then it can be assumed that you are HIV negative.
So get your HIV Elisa after 3 months and if found negative,you can forget about it.

The readings are fairly accurate and should not doubt it.
I hope to have answered your query however you can revert to me for any further query.
Thanks and best of luck.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Unprotected sex. Negative for HIV ELISA test. How accurate is this test? 1 hour later
WHAT TEST CAN I TAKE IN THE MEAN WHILE , I NEED TO KNOW THE STATUS BEFORE THAT , ALSO WHAT IS THE ACCURACY OF A 5 WEEK TEST ?

ALSO WHAT IS THE POSSIBILITY OF HIV INFECTION WITH A SINGLE PROTECTED ENCOUNTER
 
 
Answered by Dr. Pavan Kumar Gupta 3 hours later
Hello.
Thanks for writing back
There are two tests which can detect the presence of HIV infection during the 1 to 3 weeks after the exposure.
These are
HIV RNA PCR
and
P24 antigen test.
A negative HIV ELISA test at 5 weeks does not completely rule out HIV infection and has to be followed by HIV ELISA at 3 months.

The chances of getting HIV infection with a single protected encounter is very remote but still you can't take any chance and therefore doubts should always be cleared by resorting to tests.
Thanks
Regards
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Unprotected sex. Negative for HIV ELISA test. How accurate is this test? 21 hours later
Please could you suggest how I can do the HIV RNA PCR test in Mumbai or the P24 antigen test in Mumbai , also do I need a doctor prescription to do that and please recommend some LABS , where I could do that . Currently I am in week 6 and would like to clear all doubts .
 
 
Answered by Dr. Pavan Kumar Gupta 2 hours later
Hello
It is better if you get a HIV RNA PCR test done now instead of p24 antigen test as p24 test is best done between 1 to 3 weeks post exposure.
There is a limitation for doctors working online as we can't give a prescription to you.
You have to find some body locally who can help you in getting prescription.
There are plenty of good labs in Bombay which can be enquired from the doctor who gives the prescription to you.
Thanks
Regards
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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