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Permanent solution for hyperacusis after traumatic miscarriage?

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Nephrologist
Practicing since : 2009
Answered : 4361 Questions
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Hi, I developed hyperacusis after a traumatic miscarriage 6 months ago. I've been doing sound therapy and the problem dissapeared for around 2 months, recently I became stressed at work and it's flared up again. I'm just wondering if this problem can be resolved fully or is it a lifelong problem? Is there anything further I need to do in terms of treatment, are there any test that I need to have done?
Posted Sat, 8 Mar 2014 in General Health
 
 
Answered by Dr. Rakesh Madhyastha 44 minutes later
Brief Answer: Hello Detailed Answer: Thanks for the query I understand your concern, hyperacusis is a very difficult problem to treat especially because the patient does not have any control over the sounds produced outside for example car horn, loud music, etc. Very unfortunately there is no surgical treatment for hyperacusis as of now. Sound therapy is the only option. However to reduce the stress you can take Tab Metroprolol once a day and tab Alprazolam 0.25 once to twice daily, it will also help you slightly with the hyperacusis It can be resolved temporarily but you will have on and off flares. These flares will become less frequent as your body starts adjusting to various situations You can approach an ENT specialist to get an audiometry done, here they can quantify at what decibels you start becoming uncomfortable and the noise to which you are uncomfortable. It is known as loudness discomfort levels. This information will be helpful to plan out your day. I hope I was of help, if you have any further queries please get back to me I wish you good health Regards
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Follow-up: Permanent solution for hyperacusis after traumatic miscarriage? 18 minutes later
Thank you for your answer. When you say the flares will become less frequent do you mean that eventually it won't be a problem anymore? My understanding from consultation with an audiologist is that people do recover from hyperacusis but your answer sounds like this isn't the case.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Rakesh Madhyastha 16 hours later
Brief Answer: Hello Detailed Answer: Thanks for getting back I am sorry for the short delay in my response, I was on call at my hospital I meant flares will become less frequent and you will be able to cope up with these flares over time. People do recover from hyperacusis but they are always prone to have flares especially when there is a strong enough triggering factor. On the whole the prognosis is good and most people do well I hope I was of help Regards
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