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Had a finger tip amputation after a severe cut. Wound is cured. Suggest the usage of ECM powder?

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Orthopaedic Surgeon
Practicing since : 1998
Answered : 4917 Questions
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Hi. I am writing this question on behalf of my father who had a finger tip amputation after a severe cut while he was working. It's been 1 year now since his finger has some what restored,but it's still didn't completely restore since it didn't grow back or anything (the only thing the doctors did was warp it's skin around it and close up the wound).
Now I explained him about Extracellular Matrix and he is interested in buying it; Matristem Wound Matrix (from ACell) but since 1 year has passed, and the wound is pretty much fixed, is it still possible to apply the Extracellular Matrix powder to the finger tip to regrow it, or do we have to create a small wound on the finger and apply the ECM powder (for instance; creating a small cut on the finger tip, and then applying it)
Posted Mon, 16 Sep 2013 in Bones, Muscles and Joints
 
 
Answered by Dr. Vaibhav Gandhi 2 hours later
Brief Answer:
Extracellular matrix can not be applied now

Detailed Answer:
Hello

Thanks for writing to us,

I have studied your case with diligence.

Extracellular matrix powder works on regeneration of tissue on red granulating wounds. Those wound in which process of healing is delayed can be enhanced by using matrix powder. Since in your case wound has healed role of matrix powder is limited.

I will advise you if you need finger reconstruction then small rotation muscle flap will give good results cosmetically and functionally.
Creating a small cut and applying powder is not recommended.

I hope that I have answered your query. Let me know if I can help you further.

Take care
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Had a finger tip amputation after a severe cut. Wound is cured. Suggest the usage of ECM powder? 7 hours later
Is there any way to reconstruct the tissue? plastic surgery may be an option but isn't it possible to reconstruct the whole missing piece of finger tip by doing a small skin tip amputation (cutting off a small layer of the skin) and then applying the ECM? I may not be recommended but would it still be effective?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Vaibhav Gandhi 10 minutes later
Brief Answer:
Plastic surgery will benefit more

Detailed Answer:
Hello again,

Cutting small layer of skin and applying ECM will not help much.
There will not be much tissue growth as natural process of healing has already completed.
Plastic surgery with muscle flap reconstruction is best way to reconstruct tissue.

Take care.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Had a finger tip amputation after a severe cut. Wound is cured. Suggest the usage of ECM powder? 11 hours later
Is there then also a way to regrow the finger nail after having done plastic surgery?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Vaibhav Gandhi 2 hours later
Brief Answer:
No, finger nail can't regrow

Detailed Answer:
Hello again,

There is destruction of nail bed; so nail can't be regrown.
Another option is to use artificial silicon finger with cosmetic good looking finger tip and nail also.

Take care
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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