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Diagnosed with COPD, have shortness of breathe and suffer from anxiety. Suggest?

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Pulmonologist
Practicing since : 2003
Answered : 598 Questions
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Hi, just a query.

I am diagnosed with copd but, until i see the specialost next month I don't know the type I have.

Now, sometimes I get what I would describe as a mild sense of air hunger (it feels as if it is hard to take a deep and indeed satisfying deep breath) the bizzare thing is that, even when I have such sensations, my oxygen levels when tested are always perfect (I have a SP02 meter of my own)

I also suffer with anxiety.

I wondered, is this issue related to copd, or is it simply anxiety related?

I am male, and 32 years old
Posted Tue, 8 Oct 2013 in Lung and Chest disorders
 
 
Answered by Dr. Gyanshankar Mishra 3 hours later
Brief Answer:
PFT will lead to the cause of breathlessness.

Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Thanks for posting the query on XXXXXXX After going through the query, I would like to comment the following:

1.You seem to have been diagnosed with COPD with anxiety disorder.

2. Both are potential causes of breathlessness.

3. Your SpO2 is normal & it's a good news but do remember that SpO2 drops very late in the disease course of COPD.

4. You need to visit a pulmonologist and get yourself clinically evaluated in detail. Investigations required are Chest Xray and Pulmonary function test. If required, a CT Scan of the thorax may be adviced.

5. For COPD, the mainstay of treatment is Inhalers with certain oral medications of the class of bronchodilators.

6. Smoking cessation is required, if you are a smoker.

I hope I have answered your query. I will be glad to answer follow up queries if any.
Please accept my answer if you have no follow up queries.

Regards

Dr. Gyanshankar Mishra
MBBS MD DNB
Consultant Pulmonologist
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Diagnosed with COPD, have shortness of breathe and suffer from anxiety. Suggest? 7 days later
Hi there, thank you for your reaponse, I apologise in my delayed response in my follow up.

What is PFT? And how does that work? And next question, how can I appiese it?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Gyanshankar Mishra 7 minutes later
Brief Answer:
PFT - Pulmonary Function Test

Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Thanks for the follow up. After going through your follow up, I would like to comment the following:

PFT is Pulmonary Function Test. Usually it is done by spirometry which is a smiple procedure and takes about 30 to 45 minute. You just need to blow in and out of a machine which then measures your lung capacities. Its appointment can be taken with a Pulmonologist and based on its report, your diagnosis and Severity of asthma is confirmed. The medications are then prescribed accordingly.

Since you are interested in the test, here is the official patient brochure regarding the test in COPD patients:
WWW.WWWW.WW
I hope I have answered your query. I will be glad to answer follow up queries if any.
Please accept my answer if you have no follow up queries.

Regards

Dr. Gyanshankar Mishra
MBBS MD DNB
Consultant Pulmonologist
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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