Get your Health question answered in 3 easy steps
A Doctor will be with you shortly
Ask a Doctor Now
186 Doctors are Online
Ask a Dentist   »  

Chronic user of cocaine. Used composite veneer. What is causing composite veneer to stain?

User rating for this question
Very Good
Answered by
Practicing since : 2010
Answered : 393 Questions
Question
Hi Doc, I have been a chronic user of cocaine for a year now. Early this year I had my upper 4 front teeth done with composite veneer to add length, I really regret it. :( It gets stained so easily when I drink wine and I don't know if snorting cocaine has any cause of dental plaques which I never used to get before. Composite veneer is a bad idea and can get stained easily? I did my research before I had composite veneer it should reduce stain but apparently not :( I do not rub cocaine on my gums or teeth but the centric part on top and below my teeth are not symmetrical anymore :( looks like my left lower teeth shifted to the right :( I floss and brush regularly but still have this problem. Shall I ask my dentist to reduce the length and make it the normal size as before I had the Composite Veneer? My lower teeth also moved and there are gaps now between each teeth, what causes this and can this be reversed? Thank you
Posted Sun, 9 Dec 2012 in Dental Health
 
 
Answered by Dr. Bibhu Dutt Nanda 12 hours later
Hello,

Thanks for writing to us.

According to the dental history presented here by you, I would like you to know staining of the composite veneers is from cocaine only; it is not from plaque accumulation. I will be able to guide you better if you can provide me with a picture of your teeth.

The gaps which have now developed between your lower front teeth is either due to accumulation of plaque and calculus which cause inflammation of gums, further causing the teeth to become mobile or if one of your lower right tooth is missing (extracted) causing the adjacent teeth to move into the empty space.

In addition, I would like to inform you that, altering the length of the veneers would not resolve this problem, therefore, I advise you to see your dentist.

Depending upon the severity of the condition only, we can decide whether the situation is reversible or not.

I hope this answer was useful. Feel free to post any further questions.

I wish you good health.

Take care.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Chronic user of cocaine. Used composite veneer. What is causing composite veneer to stain? 6 hours later
Thank you for your reply. Please see my comments below:

According to the dental history presented here by you, I would like you to know staining of the composite veneers is from cocaine only; it is not from plaque accumulation. I will be able to guide you better if you can provide me with a picture of your teeth.
1. Not only my composite veneers but all my teeth gets easily stained now when I drink red wine. I also get plaques now and I never used to have it. Could these be from cocaine? How can snorting cocaine cause this? How do I send you a picture of my before and after teeth?

The gaps which have now developed between your lower front teeth is either due to accumulation of plaque and calculus which cause inflammation of gums, further causing the teeth to become mobile or if one of your lower right tooth is missing (extracted) causing the adjacent teeth to move into the empty space.
2. I don't have a missing tooth, could it be the receding gums? My gums are not painful or inflamed but my front teeth gets painful sometimes when I snort cocaine, why is this? Can cocaine cause plaque because of dehydration? How can this be reversed as well the gaps and movement of the lower front teeth?

In addition, I would like to inform you that, altering the length of the veneers would not resolve this problem, therefore, I advise you to see your dentist.
3. My veneers are not concentric and when I bite the right side has a gap but dentist said the size of the second front left and second front right is even, how can this be corrected?



Depending upon the severity of the condition only, we can decide whether the situation is reversible or not.
 
 
Answered by Dr. Bibhu Dutt Nanda 15 hours later
Hi,

Thanks again for writing back,

1. Plaque accumulation can occur in every individual irrespective of the diet. Staining of teeth can be from cocaine as well red wine. It can occur due to other beverages too.

You can post your picture using the upload feature available on this webpage. This site's uploader can also be used if you wish to upload any other information.

2. Yes, receding gums is one of the cause for causing gaps between your teeth.
Cocaine causes irritation to the gums, gums then undergoes changes like recession, making the teeth weak and mobile. Therefore teeth start drifting from their original position creating gaps.
In order to reverse this condition, your dentist will perform a full mouth scaling first and depending upon the response of the tissues either splinting or composite fillings can be done.

3. If you feel composite veneers are not comfortable while chewing, I would advise you to see a specialist (Prosthodontist or an Endodontist). Slight alteration is possible, but if you are not satisfied then the dental work might have to be repeated.

I hope this clarifies your doubts. Feel free to write back.

Good luck and take care
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Question is related to
Diseases and Conditions
Medical Topics

The user accepted the expert's answer

Ask a Dentist

© Ebix, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
All the information, content and live chat provided on the site is intended to be for informational purposes only, and not a substitute for professional or medical advice. You should always speak with your doctor before you follow anything that you read on this website. Any health question asked on this site will be visible to the people who browse this site. Hence, the user assumes the responsibility not to divulge any personally identifiable information in the question. Use of this site is subject to our Terms & Conditions
Already Rated.
Your rating:

Ask a Doctor