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Can I use gabapentin for boils on butt?

DOCTOR OF THE MONTH - Dec 2013
Dec 2013
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Dermatologist
Practicing since : 2002
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Question
Why do I get boils on my butt off and on for 6 months? Also is Gabapentin 300 mg ok to use for the pain on my butt?
Posted Sat, 16 Nov 2013 in Skin Hair and Nails
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sanjay Kumar Kanodia 5 days later
Brief Answer:
Kinldy go through the detailed mail

Detailed Answer:
Hi,
Welcome and thanks for posting your query to Healthcare magic.

I can understand your regarding the recurrent boils on your butt area.

Let you understand the basics of your problem. The origin of the problem is basically from hair root or oil gland. Now both of these structures are interrelated. These are present on all over our body including the butt area too. Each of our oil gland is attached to hair root and it opens on the surface of skin. So if there is problem to either of the structure then that will affect both.

When the oil gland gets blocked then the oil secreted from the glands is not able to come out on surface leading to noninfectious or non bacterial folliculitis or boils without pus. These pose less problem of pain or itching or redness and are common entity.

Our skin harbors millions of bacteria which normally and usually do not cause any infection. When the oil glands or hair root get infected by any infectious agent then it leads to folliculitis proper and are commonly known as boils.

In this condition we find pain, itching and redness of variable nature. If the infection is superficial then it causes less of pain and redness and called as superficial folliculitis and if it is deep then it causes higher of these symptoms and known as deep folliculitis.

It is important to know that the causative infectious agent also vary form different of bacterias.

In your case there is recurrent eruptions. This can be due to mainly the hygiene related features. At butt area there is always a tendency of high moisture and friction when we are sitting. It is always a closed area leading to sweating and thus recurrent infection.

I would like to guide you for the preventive care. These are as follows:

1. Do not pinch, pop or squeeze any of the affected areas.

2. Do not apply any creamy or oily stuff at or near the butt area.

3. Try to avoid any home remedies suggested by your friends or family members or otherwise self implicated therapies also.

4. Try avoiding situations of heat, sweating and humidity for long hours. Do not take hot showers and avoid heavy exercise and gym for few days. Do not sit for long hours.

5. Take two times bath. Gently wash the affected areas with the antibacterial soap.

6. You can apply antibiotic creams such as gentamycin or mupirocin on affected area.

For the dose of gabapentin - it is variable form minimum of 150 mg to more thousand of milligrams. So there is variability of the dose. I would like to suggest you for a more better option of pregabalin which is a newer and latest biochemical related to gabapentin. It can be taken minimum of 150 mg only. So you can ask your doctor to shift to pregabalin as a better option.

Hope these informations will help you. If you have any further query I will be glad to help.

Regards.
Dr Sanjay
MD (Dermatology)
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Can I use gabapentin for boils on butt? 7 hours later
I went to the DR. and he said it was staff infection or Mesa. How would I contact this staff infection or how could I contact it?
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sanjay Kumar Kanodia 10 hours later
Brief Answer:
Kindly go through the detailed mail

Detailed Answer:
Hi,

Welcome and thanks for your follow up query.

As the doctor said it is either Staphylococcus aureus (also called staph aureus / "Staph") or a MRSA (not Mesa) or also known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

So you can get that both the terms of staph and MRSA are part of same bacteria Staphylococcus aureus.

Staphylococcus aureus is a bacteria which is the main cause of boils as I already described before.

Usually this bacterium is present on the skin or nasal lining in 30 – 40 % of healthy individuals and causes no problem.

However, when the skin is damaged, even with a minor injury such as a scratch or a small cut from shaving, Staph can get entered into the skin and can cause boils. These boils can be recurrent in old age due to weakened immune system.
Presently there are two groups of bacteria of staph origin-

-The one which is sensitive to methicillin also known as MSSA or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the other MRSA or also known as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus – where methicillin is type of antibiotic related to Penicllin group.

-There are specific of the treatments for each group as decided by certain tests done in laboratory.

Regarding the part of contracting the bacteria- all of us carry these bacteria on our skin. Now whether it is MSSA or MRSA is variable form person to person but most commonly it is MSSA. Now half of the population is MSSA positive and other half is MRSA positive. We can become colonized with MRSA in a variety of ways such as by touching the skin of another person who is colonized with MRSA, by the breathe, cough, or sneeze and by mere touching a contaminated surface (such as a counter top, door handle, or phone).

So you probably got the idea regarding the causative agent of your problem. By proper care you will be alright soon. By improve your nutrition an hygiene you will be alright soon.

Hope these informations will help you. If you have any further query I will be glad to help or if you do not then can close the discussion and rate the answer.

Regards.
Dr Sanjay
MD (Dermatology)
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
Follow-up: Can I use gabapentin for boils on butt? 11 hours later
Is this Mrsa contiguous? If so how easy is it to give to my wife.. She wants to know.. Thanks
 
 
Answered by Dr. Sanjay Kumar Kanodia 11 hours later
Brief Answer:
Kindly go through the detailed mail

Detailed Answer:
Hello,

Regarding your further query- The very first and foremost of the thing you should know is that both MSSA and MRSA are simple bacteria only and nothing else. These are both well treatable. The only difference is of the sensitivity to particular penicillin group of antibiotics which we call as Methicillin. Threfore one in methicillin- sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and the other is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Both group of bacteria can be passed form one person to other but it depends on immunity of person to have the kind of boils that one is getting. As I said previously nearly 30% of normal individuals carry staph aureus but it causes problem in few. So in your wife too if she is already carrying it, then also it will not exactly cause the problem.

So I reassure you again that this is nothing to do with your wife’s carriage. You take proper healthy diet and healthy life style with best antibiotic treatment to get rid of the infection.

Hope these informations will help you. If you have any further query I will be glad to help or if you do not then can close the discussion and rate the answer.

Regards.
Dr Sanjay
MD (Dermatology)
Above answer was peer-reviewed by
 
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