Malar rash

What is Malar rash?

In medicine, malar rash (from Latin ‘jaw, cheek-bone’), also called butterfly rash, is a medical sign consisting of a characteristic form of facial rash. It is often seen in lupus erythematosus but is not pathognomonic - it is also seen in other diseases such as pellagra, dermatomyositis, and Bloom syndrome.

The malar rash of lupus is red or purplish and mildly scaly. Characteristically, it has the shape of a butterfly and involves the bridge of the nose. Notably, the rash spares the nasolabial folds of the face, which contributes to its characteristic appearance. It is usually macular with sharp edges and not itchy. The rash can be transient or progressive with involvement of other parts of the facial skin.

Questions and answers on "Malar rash"



in 2011 I was dxd with an autoimmune disease I was started on plaquanil and later added methotrexate I had a positive rheumatoid factor and high...

doctor1 MD

atually this can be spreading of disease to other organ systems you caan not stop medicines like this consult the immunologist to see the effects...

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I woke up one morning in XXXXXXX 2008 and thought I was getting the flu and things were never the same since. I had what they believe was an auto...

doctor1 MD

Hi XXXXXXX

Thanks for your query.

Your XXXXXXX titre is definitely high and some of the symptoms do correlate with Lupus.
So your disease...

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my husband has an autoimmune disease they arent sure which one test just came back positive for one. We thought it was Lupus but that test has come...

doctor1 MD

hi,
if the ANA is coming out to be negative, then it is less likely to be due to lupus or an auto immune disease.

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