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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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What is the actual difference between dyskariyosis & dysplasia?

Hello, this is a question I have found most confusing. What is the actual difference between dyskariyosis and dysplasia? I was told upon having my smear test that I have low grade dyskariyosis and also high risk HPV. After having the colposcopy done, they took 2 biopsies of which came back CIN1 with no further treatment needed. No mention of HPV in my pathology report? Is this normal? They chose to use the watchful waiting and referred me back in a years time. What are the chances of it progressing within the year? Is there more chance of it regressing even with high risk HPV? It s all so confusing. Thank you. Danielle
Thu, 27 Oct 2016
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Anesthesiologist 's  Response
Hello Danielle,

I understand your concern. To answer your first question, the difference between dyskariosis and dysplasia can be comparable, somehow, to difference between quality and quantity, in that, dyskariosis basically means changes in the nucleus of the cells, whereas dysplasia is increase in the number of cells.
CIN1, which stands for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, practically means that only one third of the cervical cells have dysplasia, or are abnormal. Furthermore, the cells in CIN1 are not nearly as abnormal looking as in moderate (CIN2) or severe (CIN3) dysplasia.
Approximately, one in six women develop CIN1, which does not require any treatment and will usually disappear on its own. So watchful waiting and follow up is the routine and the sensible thing to do.
A one time positive HPV test does not necessarily mean you will get cervical cancer. In most cases, the body will fight off the high risk HP virus in one or two years. And even if it develops into cancer, it takes from 10 to 30 years for the high risk HPV to develop into a small tumor.
There are certain factors, which, if exposed to, will increase the probability of CIN1 evolving to further stages, factors such as infection with Chlamydia or HSV2 (herpes simplex virus 2), a first degree relative (mother or sister) with a history of cervical cancer, smoking, low levels of folic acid and a weak immune system.

I hope this answers your questions. Wishing you good health and all the best.
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What is the actual difference between dyskariyosis & dysplasia?

Hello Danielle, I understand your concern. To answer your first question, the difference between dyskariosis and dysplasia can be comparable, somehow, to difference between quality and quantity, in that, dyskariosis basically means changes in the nucleus of the cells, whereas dysplasia is increase in the number of cells. CIN1, which stands for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, practically means that only one third of the cervical cells have dysplasia, or are abnormal. Furthermore, the cells in CIN1 are not nearly as abnormal looking as in moderate (CIN2) or severe (CIN3) dysplasia. Approximately, one in six women develop CIN1, which does not require any treatment and will usually disappear on its own. So watchful waiting and follow up is the routine and the sensible thing to do. A one time positive HPV test does not necessarily mean you will get cervical cancer. In most cases, the body will fight off the high risk HP virus in one or two years. And even if it develops into cancer, it takes from 10 to 30 years for the high risk HPV to develop into a small tumor. There are certain factors, which, if exposed to, will increase the probability of CIN1 evolving to further stages, factors such as infection with Chlamydia or HSV2 (herpes simplex virus 2), a first degree relative (mother or sister) with a history of cervical cancer, smoking, low levels of folic acid and a weak immune system. I hope this answers your questions. Wishing you good health and all the best.