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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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What does my blood test indicate?

My blood tests show low red blood cell count, low hemoglobin, low heavier, high red standard deviation, high mean platelet volume, high immature granulocytes percent, and high imm granulocyte absolute count. The rest is within normal limits. What does that mean?
Wed, 28 Jan 2015
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General & Family Physician 's  Response
Hi!
Welcome to HCM!

The findings given in your question are suggestive of Megaloblastic anemia.

The two most common causes of megaloblastic anemia are deficiencies of either folic acid, or of vitamin B12. When the cause is a lack of vitamin B12 due to malabsorption in the intestines, it is called pernicious anemia. Other causes can include alcohol abuse, leukemia, certain medications, and some genetic conditions.

Before treatment, the cause must be identified. Deficiency of vitamin B12 or folate is suspected if megaloblastic anemia is recognized; these disorders are indistinguishable on the basis of peripheral blood and bone marrow findings, so vitamin B12 and folate levels are required.
Treatment depends on the cause.
Drugs causing megaloblastic states may need to be eliminated or given in reduced doses.
A detailed lab investigations are required to detect the cause of anemia in your case.
I hope your query has been answered.
Regards!
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What does my blood test indicate?

Hi! Welcome to HCM! The findings given in your question are suggestive of Megaloblastic anemia. The two most common causes of megaloblastic anemia are deficiencies of either folic acid, or of vitamin B12. When the cause is a lack of vitamin B12 due to malabsorption in the intestines, it is called pernicious anemia. Other causes can include alcohol abuse, leukemia, certain medications, and some genetic conditions. Before treatment, the cause must be identified. Deficiency of vitamin B12 or folate is suspected if megaloblastic anemia is recognized; these disorders are indistinguishable on the basis of peripheral blood and bone marrow findings, so vitamin B12 and folate levels are required. Treatment depends on the cause. Drugs causing megaloblastic states may need to be eliminated or given in reduced doses. A detailed lab investigations are required to detect the cause of anemia in your case. I hope your query has been answered. Regards!