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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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What Causes Soreness In Breasts When Suffering From Cervical Cancer?

Hi there I have the marina inserted in my cervix and I started taking champix to quit smoking two weeks ago, my question is can the champix interfere with the marina.? Because I have started to get really sore boobs and I am gaining weight. But have suffered from wheat intolerance which explains the bloating and weight gain just don t know about why my boobs are sore and have gone up a size with drastic stretch marks.! Please help.! Oh and p.s I have done pregnancy tests and they are negative but I have cervical cancer and was told I may get false negatives.!
Mon, 22 Jan 2018
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Oncologist 's  Response
Hi
Soreness in breasts when suffering from cervical cancer is due to its relation to how the breast tissue responds to monthly changes in a woman's estrogen and progesterone hormone levels.

If breast pain is accompanied by lumpiness, cysts (accumulated packets of fluid), or areas of thickness, the condition is usually called fibrocystic change. During each menstrual cycle, breast tissue sometimes swells because hormonal stimulation causes the breast's milk glands and ducts to enlarge, and in turn, the breasts retain water. The breasts may feel swollen, painful, tender, or lumpy a few days before menstruation. Breast pain and swelling usually ends when menstruation is over.

Cyclical breast pain may last for several years but usually stops after menopause unless a woman uses hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

Most women with moderate breast pain are not treated with medications or surgical procedures.

The following suggestions have been shown to reduce breast pain in some women.

Wear a good, supportive bra to reduce breast movement. Many women with breast pain find it comfortable to also wear a bra while they sleep.
Limit sodium intake.
Reduce caffeine intake (coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate).
Maintain a low fat diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and grains.
Maintain an ideal weight. Losing excess weight may reduce breast pain by stabilizing hormone levels.
Occasionally use over-the-counter pain-relief drugs such aspirin, acetaminophen, or Motrin.
Take vitamins. Some women have found that taking Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), Vitamin B1 (thiamine), and Vitamin E relieves breast pain.
Try evening primrose oil. Some women have found that regular consumption of the herb, evening primrose oil, in liquid or tablet form reduces breast pain.
Cyst aspiration. Physicians sometimes drain benign (non-cancerous), fluid-filled cysts to relieve breast pain. It may not be possible to drain very small cysts.
Relax. Some breast pain can be caused by stress and may subside by reducing anxiety and tension.
If breast pain is severe and interferes with a woman's daily activities, further treatment may be necessary. Diuretics, substances that remove excess fluid from the body in the form of urine, are the most commonly prescribed treatment for persistent, non-cyclical breast pain. The release of fluid in the body helps decrease breast pain and swelling.

Drug treatments for severe breast pain include:

danazol
bromocriptine
Bromocriptine and danazol both relieve cyclical breast pain by blocking certain hormones (such as estrogen and progesterone). However, these drugs may cause serious side effects in some women. Bromocriptine is poorly tolerated by many patients; side effects include nausea, dizziness, and fertility problems. Side effects of danazol may include weight gain, amenorrhea (absence of menstruation), and masculinization (such as extra facial hair) when given high doses. Other drugs, such as tamoxifen or goserelin, have been shown to have some effect on cyclical breast pain; however, these drugs are presently only approved for use in women with breast pain in the United Kingdom.

In cases where non-cyclical pain occurs only in a specific area of the breast (localized pain), physicians may choose to inject anesthetics or corticosteriods in this "target area" to relieve the pain. In very rare cases, the painful area may be surgically removed. However, surgery usually leads to increased breast pain, and some women may develop non-cyclical breast pain at the site of previous surgeries on the breast.

Regards

Dr De






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What Causes Soreness In Breasts When Suffering From Cervical Cancer?

Hi Soreness in breasts when suffering from cervical cancer is due to its relation to how the breast tissue responds to monthly changes in a woman s estrogen and progesterone hormone levels. If breast pain is accompanied by lumpiness, cysts (accumulated packets of fluid), or areas of thickness, the condition is usually called fibrocystic change. During each menstrual cycle, breast tissue sometimes swells because hormonal stimulation causes the breast s milk glands and ducts to enlarge, and in turn, the breasts retain water. The breasts may feel swollen, painful, tender, or lumpy a few days before menstruation. Breast pain and swelling usually ends when menstruation is over. Cyclical breast pain may last for several years but usually stops after menopause unless a woman uses hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Most women with moderate breast pain are not treated with medications or surgical procedures. The following suggestions have been shown to reduce breast pain in some women. Wear a good, supportive bra to reduce breast movement. Many women with breast pain find it comfortable to also wear a bra while they sleep. Limit sodium intake. Reduce caffeine intake (coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate). Maintain a low fat diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and grains. Maintain an ideal weight. Losing excess weight may reduce breast pain by stabilizing hormone levels. Occasionally use over-the-counter pain-relief drugs such aspirin, acetaminophen, or Motrin. Take vitamins. Some women have found that taking Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), Vitamin B1 (thiamine), and Vitamin E relieves breast pain. Try evening primrose oil. Some women have found that regular consumption of the herb, evening primrose oil, in liquid or tablet form reduces breast pain. Cyst aspiration. Physicians sometimes drain benign (non-cancerous), fluid-filled cysts to relieve breast pain. It may not be possible to drain very small cysts. Relax. Some breast pain can be caused by stress and may subside by reducing anxiety and tension. If breast pain is severe and interferes with a woman s daily activities, further treatment may be necessary. Diuretics, substances that remove excess fluid from the body in the form of urine, are the most commonly prescribed treatment for persistent, non-cyclical breast pain. The release of fluid in the body helps decrease breast pain and swelling. Drug treatments for severe breast pain include: danazol bromocriptine Bromocriptine and danazol both relieve cyclical breast pain by blocking certain hormones (such as estrogen and progesterone). However, these drugs may cause serious side effects in some women. Bromocriptine is poorly tolerated by many patients; side effects include nausea, dizziness, and fertility problems. Side effects of danazol may include weight gain, amenorrhea (absence of menstruation), and masculinization (such as extra facial hair) when given high doses. Other drugs, such as tamoxifen or goserelin, have been shown to have some effect on cyclical breast pain; however, these drugs are presently only approved for use in women with breast pain in the United Kingdom. In cases where non-cyclical pain occurs only in a specific area of the breast (localized pain), physicians may choose to inject anesthetics or corticosteriods in this target area to relieve the pain. In very rare cases, the painful area may be surgically removed. However, surgery usually leads to increased breast pain, and some women may develop non-cyclical breast pain at the site of previous surgeries on the breast. Regards Dr De PrintDiscussEmailShare Related Articles Methods of Cancer Treatment Cancer: Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment Images of Breast Conditions Diagnosis of Cancer Featured Articles Cancer Screening in America below National Targets Hispanic Women May Be More Likely to Die from Breast Cancer Study: Chemotherapy Effective Before or After Lumpectomy