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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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What causes recurrent dizziness?

I have a very dizzy feeling when getting up from driving or just sitting in a chair at home or anywhere. The feeling is like I have been hit in the head. I have a feeling like I will fall down and it scares the shit out of my. It can last up to 10 minutes then leaves but while it is happening I cannot do anything.
Mon, 11 Jul 2016
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Dietitian & Nutritionist 's  Response
Hello, I understand this is a scary situation for you.Some of the most common treatments for dizziness are:

*Moving slowly if standing or sitting leads to light-headedness
*Limiting use of alcohol, salt, caffeine, and tobacco
*Resting in a cool place and rehydrating if dizziness is due to overheating and dehydration. You should drink 8-10 glasses of water per day.
*Staying well hydrated, especially in warm weather
*Avoiding reading, adjusting the gps or radio when in a moving vehicle
*Improving balance through exercise (yes, this is important)

Treatments, of course, depend on the reason for your dizziness. Some of the most common reasons for this aggravating condition are:

*Feeling faint after standing or sitting up quickly, due to a drop in blood pressure. This cause is most common among older adults.This is called orthostatic hypotension, yet does not sound like what you are experiencing.
*Overheating. Activity in hot weather can cause dehydration or make people feel lightheaded. Some medications, such as diuretics, may make this condition worse.
*Low blood sugar levels. More common in individuals with diabetes, this condition can prompt unsteadiness, sweating, and anxiety.
*Medications. Lightheadedness is a side effect of many medications. These can include antidepressants, sedatives, tranquilizers, and drugs for high blood pressure and seizures.
*Anxiety. Feeling faint is a common symptom of panic attacks and anxiety-related disorders, such as agoraphobia.
*Neurological disorders. Diseases such as Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis may cause lightheadedness.
*Meniere's disease: This disease involves the buildup of fluid levels in the inner ear. The ear may feel blocked. It can be associated with hearing loss and ringing in the ears. Meniere's disease is most common in people in their 40s and 50s.
*Labyrinthitis: Caused by a viral infection. This condition can result in vertigo, plus sudden hearing loss.
*Migraine: Some migraines can be accompanied by vertigo, as well as sensitivity to light and noise.This doesn't sound like the cause of your symptoms either.

So, I suggest that while you take the precautions I listed initially to be safe, ultimately I recommend you seek the CAUSE of the dizzy spells so the treatment is tailored to the diagnosis.

Healthy Regards, Kathryn Shattler, MS,RDN
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What causes recurrent dizziness?

Hello, I understand this is a scary situation for you.Some of the most common treatments for dizziness are: *Moving slowly if standing or sitting leads to light-headedness *Limiting use of alcohol, salt, caffeine, and tobacco *Resting in a cool place and rehydrating if dizziness is due to overheating and dehydration. You should drink 8-10 glasses of water per day. *Staying well hydrated, especially in warm weather *Avoiding reading, adjusting the gps or radio when in a moving vehicle *Improving balance through exercise (yes, this is important) Treatments, of course, depend on the reason for your dizziness. Some of the most common reasons for this aggravating condition are: *Feeling faint after standing or sitting up quickly, due to a drop in blood pressure. This cause is most common among older adults.This is called orthostatic hypotension, yet does not sound like what you are experiencing. *Overheating. Activity in hot weather can cause dehydration or make people feel lightheaded. Some medications, such as diuretics, may make this condition worse. *Low blood sugar levels. More common in individuals with diabetes, this condition can prompt unsteadiness, sweating, and anxiety. *Medications. Lightheadedness is a side effect of many medications. These can include antidepressants, sedatives, tranquilizers, and drugs for high blood pressure and seizures. *Anxiety. Feeling faint is a common symptom of panic attacks and anxiety-related disorders, such as agoraphobia. *Neurological disorders. Diseases such as Parkinson s disease and multiple sclerosis may cause lightheadedness. *Meniere s disease: This disease involves the buildup of fluid levels in the inner ear. The ear may feel blocked. It can be associated with hearing loss and ringing in the ears. Meniere s disease is most common in people in their 40s and 50s. *Labyrinthitis: Caused by a viral infection. This condition can result in vertigo, plus sudden hearing loss. *Migraine: Some migraines can be accompanied by vertigo, as well as sensitivity to light and noise.This doesn t sound like the cause of your symptoms either. So, I suggest that while you take the precautions I listed initially to be safe, ultimately I recommend you seek the CAUSE of the dizzy spells so the treatment is tailored to the diagnosis. Healthy Regards, Kathryn Shattler, MS,RDN