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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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What Causes Pain In The Arch Of The Foot Post Hip Replacement Surgery?

I am having trouble with the arch of my foot...I am getting pain when I go to set my foot on the floor the best way I know how to decribe it is it feels like my arch is caving in...I have had hip replacement on both sides ..that side the last one in January ..I have had lots of problems with my lower body.I have Ra but cant take auth.meds because of asprin and nsaid
Sat, 26 Nov 2022
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Anesthesiologist 's  Response
Hello,

Hip replacement surgery is in no way related to your foot pain. Foot pain is due to the following probable causes:
1) Plantar fasciitis
2) Bone bruise
3) Calcaneal epiphysitis (Sever disease)
4) Calcaneal neuritis
5) Calcaneal stress fracture
6) Calcaneus bone injuries
7) Entrapment syndromes (eg, medial calcaneal branch of the posterior tibial nerve entrapment, abductor digiti quinti nerve entrapment, tarsal tunnel syndrome)
8) Fat pad syndrome (atrophy, heel bruise)
9) Infection
10) Inflammatory arthropathies
11) Neuropathic pain
12) Osteomalacia
13) Paget disease
14) Plantar fascia rupture
15) S1 radiculopathy
16) Sickle cell disease
17) Space-occupying lesions

In my opinion, yours is most probably plantar fasciitis and treatment is as follows:
1) Improvement often takes many weeks or months and requires considerable effort to maintain a heel-cord stretching program or to wear a night splint.
2) Wear shoes with adequate arch support and cushioned heels; discard old running shoes and wear new ones; rotate work shoes daily
3) Avoid long periods of standing
4) Lose weight
5) Stretch the plantar fascia and warm up the lower extremity before participating in exercise
6) For increased flexibility, stretch the plantar fascia and the calf after exercise
7) Do not exercise on hard surfaces
8) Avoid walking barefooted on hard surfaces
9) Avoid high-impact sports that require a great deal of jumping (eg, aerobics and volleyball)
10) Apply ice for 20 minutes after repetitive impact-loading activities and at the end of the day
11) Limit repetitive impact-loading activities such as running to every other day, and consider rest or cross-training for nonrunning days.
12) corticosteroid injection is helpful
13) Botulinum toxin type A injection
14) Autologous blood and plasma
15) Extracorporeal shockwave therapy
16) Splints and orthoses
17) Plantar fascia stretching exercises daily for 30 mins at least.

Please discuss the above treatment with your orthopedic surgeon.

Take care. Hope I have answered your question. Let me know if I can assist you further.

Regards,
Dr. Pallavi M., Anesthesiologist
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What Causes Pain In The Arch Of The Foot Post Hip Replacement Surgery?

Hello, Hip replacement surgery is in no way related to your foot pain. Foot pain is due to the following probable causes: 1) Plantar fasciitis 2) Bone bruise 3) Calcaneal epiphysitis (Sever disease) 4) Calcaneal neuritis 5) Calcaneal stress fracture 6) Calcaneus bone injuries 7) Entrapment syndromes (eg, medial calcaneal branch of the posterior tibial nerve entrapment, abductor digiti quinti nerve entrapment, tarsal tunnel syndrome) 8) Fat pad syndrome (atrophy, heel bruise) 9) Infection 10) Inflammatory arthropathies 11) Neuropathic pain 12) Osteomalacia 13) Paget disease 14) Plantar fascia rupture 15) S1 radiculopathy 16) Sickle cell disease 17) Space-occupying lesions In my opinion, yours is most probably plantar fasciitis and treatment is as follows: 1) Improvement often takes many weeks or months and requires considerable effort to maintain a heel-cord stretching program or to wear a night splint. 2) Wear shoes with adequate arch support and cushioned heels; discard old running shoes and wear new ones; rotate work shoes daily 3) Avoid long periods of standing 4) Lose weight 5) Stretch the plantar fascia and warm up the lower extremity before participating in exercise 6) For increased flexibility, stretch the plantar fascia and the calf after exercise 7) Do not exercise on hard surfaces 8) Avoid walking barefooted on hard surfaces 9) Avoid high-impact sports that require a great deal of jumping (eg, aerobics and volleyball) 10) Apply ice for 20 minutes after repetitive impact-loading activities and at the end of the day 11) Limit repetitive impact-loading activities such as running to every other day, and consider rest or cross-training for nonrunning days. 12) corticosteroid injection is helpful 13) Botulinum toxin type A injection 14) Autologous blood and plasma 15) Extracorporeal shockwave therapy 16) Splints and orthoses 17) Plantar fascia stretching exercises daily for 30 mins at least. Please discuss the above treatment with your orthopedic surgeon. Take care. Hope I have answered your question. Let me know if I can assist you further. Regards, Dr. Pallavi M., Anesthesiologist