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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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What Causes A Bad Burning Sensation Around The Ovary?

Hi, I am having a really bad burning sensation on my lower left side by my ovary also, four days ago had blood in my stool and last night had mucus in it...Now I'm in alot of pain and don't know what Dr. to go to...What might it be? I am VERY worried =(
Tue, 16 Jan 2018
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Oncologist 's  Response
Hi

The ovaries are an important part of the female reproductive system. Their job is twofold. They produce the hormones, including estrogen, that trigger menstruation. They also release at least one egg each month for possible fertilization.

A number of different conditions, from cysts to tumors, can cause ovarian pain. The ovaries are located in the lower abdomen. That means if you have ovarian pain, you'll most likely feel it in your lower abdomen -- below your belly button -- and pelvis. It's important to have any pelvic pain checked out by your regular doctor or obstetrician/gynecologist. Several different conditions can cause it.

Pain in the ovaries can either be acute or chronic. Acute ovarian pain comes on quickly (over a few minutes or days) and goes away in a short period of time. Chronic ovarian pain usually starts more gradually. Then it last for several months.

Ovarian pain may be continuous. Or it may come and go. It may get worse with certain activities, such as exercise or urination. It can be so mild that you don't notice it. Or pain in the ovaries can be so severe that it interferes with daily life.




The methods your doctor uses to diagnose ovarian pain will vary. They will be based on what the suspected cause might be. Regardless, your doctor will take a complete medical history, do a physical exam, and ask questions about your pain. The questions might include:



Diagnostic tests, such as ultrasound and other types of imaging, can zero in on the cause of the pain. Here is a rundown of some possible causes of ovarian pain and how they are diagnosed and treated.

Ovarian Cysts
Cysts are fluid-filled sacs that can form in the ovaries. They are very common in women, especially during the childbearing years. Often they form during the process of ovulation. It can happen when the egg is not released or when the sac -- follicle -- holding the egg doesn't dissolve after the egg is released. Ovarian cysts usually cause no symptoms and dissolve on their own. They can, though, create a dull ache or a sharp pain if the cyst is large and twists or ruptures.
Ovarian Pain: Possible Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatments

Ovarian Pain Caused by Endometriosis
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
Ovarian Remnant Syndrome

Other symptoms of ovarian cysts:

Irregular menstrual periods
Pain during intercourse or bowel movements
Nausea or vomiting
Feeling full after eating a small amount
Bloating
How ovarian cysts are diagnosed

Pelvic exam. This exam may reveal a lump in the pelvic area.
Ultrasound. This scan uses sound waves to create an image of the ovaries. This helps the doctor determine the size and location of a cyst.
Treatment of ovarian cysts

Watchful waiting. Most ovarian cysts will go away on their own. If you don't have any bothersome symptoms, especially if you haven't yet gone through menopause, your doctor may advocate "watchful waiting." The doctor won't treat you. Instead, the doctor might check you periodically to see if there has been any change in your condition.
Laparoscopy. This is a form of surgery that uses small incisions and a tiny, lighted camera on the end of a metal tube that's inserted into the abdomen. A surgeon can use tools on the end of the tube to remove some cysts. This technique works for smaller cysts. Larger cysts, though, may need to be removed through a bigger incision in the abdomen. This is done with a technique called laparotomy.
Birth control pills . Birth control pills prevent ovulation. That, in turn, reduces the formation of new cysts.



Ovarian Tumors
Tumors can form in the ovaries, just as they form in other parts of the body. They can be either noncancerous (benign) or cancerous (malignant).

Other symptoms of ovarian tumors

Bloating or pressure in the abdomen
Urgent need to urinate
Indigestion
Diarrhea or constipation
Loss of appetite
Unintentional weight loss or gain in the stomach area
How ovarian tumors are diagnosed


Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography(PET). These are detailed imaging scans that the doctor can use to find ovarian tumors. They allow the doctor to determine whether and how far the ovarian tumors have spread.
CA-125. This is a blood test to look for a protein that tends to be higher in some (but not all) women with ovarian cancer. CA-125 isn't effective as a screening test for ovarian cancer. But it can be checked in women with symptoms that might be caused by ovarian cancer.
Treatment of ovarian tumors

Laparotomy. This is surgery performed through an incision into the abdomen. The surgeon will remove as much of the tumor as possible. The removal of tumor tissue is called debulking. If the tumor is cancerous and has spread, the surgeon may also remove the ovaries, uterus, fallopian tubes, omentum (fatty tissue covering the intestines), and nearby lymph nodes. Laparoscopy and robotic surgery may also be used.
Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves drugs given through a vein (IV), by mouth, or directly into the abdomen. The drugs kill cancer cells. Because they kill normal cells as well, chemotherapy medications can have side effects. These can include nausea and vomiting, hair loss, kidney damage, and increased risk of infection. These side effects should go away after the treatment is stopped.
Radiation. This treatment uses high-energy X-rays to kill or shrink cancer cells. Radiation is either delivered from outside the body, or placed inside the body near the site of the tumor. This treatment also can cause side effects. These can include inflamed skin, nausea, diarrhea, and fatigue. Radiation is not often used to treat ovarian cancer.


Every month, the lining of the uterus builds up in preparation to nourish a growing fetus. When an egg is not fertilized, that lining sheds and is released from the body via menstruation. In some women, tissue like the lining of the uterus develops elsewhere in the body. This tissue swells and bleeds each month. It has nowhere to shed, though, and may form scar tissue that can be very painful.

Other symptoms of endometriosis

Painful periods
Pain during intercourse
Heavy menstrual periods
Infertility
Pain with bowel movements
Regards
Dr DE
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What Causes A Bad Burning Sensation Around The Ovary?

Hi The ovaries are an important part of the female reproductive system. Their job is twofold. They produce the hormones, including estrogen, that trigger menstruation. They also release at least one egg each month for possible fertilization. A number of different conditions, from cysts to tumors, can cause ovarian pain. The ovaries are located in the lower abdomen. That means if you have ovarian pain, you ll most likely feel it in your lower abdomen -- below your belly button -- and pelvis. It s important to have any pelvic pain checked out by your regular doctor or obstetrician/gynecologist. Several different conditions can cause it. Pain in the ovaries can either be acute or chronic. Acute ovarian pain comes on quickly (over a few minutes or days) and goes away in a short period of time. Chronic ovarian pain usually starts more gradually. Then it last for several months. Ovarian pain may be continuous. Or it may come and go. It may get worse with certain activities, such as exercise or urination. It can be so mild that you don t notice it. Or pain in the ovaries can be so severe that it interferes with daily life. The methods your doctor uses to diagnose ovarian pain will vary. They will be based on what the suspected cause might be. Regardless, your doctor will take a complete medical history, do a physical exam, and ask questions about your pain. The questions might include: Diagnostic tests, such as ultrasound and other types of imaging, can zero in on the cause of the pain. Here is a rundown of some possible causes of ovarian pain and how they are diagnosed and treated. Ovarian Cysts Cysts are fluid-filled sacs that can form in the ovaries. They are very common in women, especially during the childbearing years. Often they form during the process of ovulation. It can happen when the egg is not released or when the sac -- follicle -- holding the egg doesn t dissolve after the egg is released. Ovarian cysts usually cause no symptoms and dissolve on their own. They can, though, create a dull ache or a sharp pain if the cyst is large and twists or ruptures. Ovarian Pain: Possible Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatments Ovarian Pain Caused by Endometriosis Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Ovarian Remnant Syndrome Other symptoms of ovarian cysts: Irregular menstrual periods Pain during intercourse or bowel movements Nausea or vomiting Feeling full after eating a small amount Bloating How ovarian cysts are diagnosed Pelvic exam. This exam may reveal a lump in the pelvic area. Ultrasound. This scan uses sound waves to create an image of the ovaries. This helps the doctor determine the size and location of a cyst. Treatment of ovarian cysts Watchful waiting. Most ovarian cysts will go away on their own. If you don t have any bothersome symptoms, especially if you haven t yet gone through menopause, your doctor may advocate watchful waiting. The doctor won t treat you. Instead, the doctor might check you periodically to see if there has been any change in your condition. Laparoscopy. This is a form of surgery that uses small incisions and a tiny, lighted camera on the end of a metal tube that s inserted into the abdomen. A surgeon can use tools on the end of the tube to remove some cysts. This technique works for smaller cysts. Larger cysts, though, may need to be removed through a bigger incision in the abdomen. This is done with a technique called laparotomy. Birth control pills . Birth control pills prevent ovulation. That, in turn, reduces the formation of new cysts. Ovarian Tumors Tumors can form in the ovaries, just as they form in other parts of the body. They can be either noncancerous (benign) or cancerous (malignant). Other symptoms of ovarian tumors Bloating or pressure in the abdomen Urgent need to urinate Indigestion Diarrhea or constipation Loss of appetite Unintentional weight loss or gain in the stomach area How ovarian tumors are diagnosed Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography(PET). These are detailed imaging scans that the doctor can use to find ovarian tumors. They allow the doctor to determine whether and how far the ovarian tumors have spread. CA-125. This is a blood test to look for a protein that tends to be higher in some (but not all) women with ovarian cancer. CA-125 isn t effective as a screening test for ovarian cancer. But it can be checked in women with symptoms that might be caused by ovarian cancer. Treatment of ovarian tumors Laparotomy. This is surgery performed through an incision into the abdomen. The surgeon will remove as much of the tumor as possible. The removal of tumor tissue is called debulking. If the tumor is cancerous and has spread, the surgeon may also remove the ovaries, uterus, fallopian tubes, omentum (fatty tissue covering the intestines), and nearby lymph nodes. Laparoscopy and robotic surgery may also be used. Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves drugs given through a vein (IV), by mouth, or directly into the abdomen. The drugs kill cancer cells. Because they kill normal cells as well, chemotherapy medications can have side effects. These can include nausea and vomiting, hair loss, kidney damage, and increased risk of infection. These side effects should go away after the treatment is stopped. Radiation. This treatment uses high-energy X-rays to kill or shrink cancer cells. Radiation is either delivered from outside the body, or placed inside the body near the site of the tumor. This treatment also can cause side effects. These can include inflamed skin, nausea, diarrhea, and fatigue. Radiation is not often used to treat ovarian cancer. Every month, the lining of the uterus builds up in preparation to nourish a growing fetus. When an egg is not fertilized, that lining sheds and is released from the body via menstruation. In some women, tissue like the lining of the uterus develops elsewhere in the body. This tissue swells and bleeds each month. It has nowhere to shed, though, and may form scar tissue that can be very painful. Other symptoms of endometriosis Painful periods Pain during intercourse Heavy menstrual periods Infertility Pain with bowel movements Regards Dr DE