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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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How long does a dog bite injury take to heal?

About a month and a half ago I goy a really bad dog bite to my left thumb where a canine from the upper jaw went into the right corner of my nail by my cuticle and a canine from the lower jaw went into my nail by my critical on the left side. The teeth sliced through the front of my finger. I went to a doctor got a Tetnus shot and the dog was current on rabies. The pad of my finger where the laceration was is now bubbled up and I can see little red vein like lines in it. My finger nail still has 2 slices through it and now at the base of the nail by the cuticle is yellow in a half circle shape. I still can not bend my finger and it s still painful to the touch is all this normal and should I expect the bubbled up laceration area to go back to being flat?
Thu, 9 Apr 2015
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General & Family Physician 's  Response
Injuries may involve structures deep beneath the skin including muscles, bones, nerves, and blood vessels.
Infections, including tetanus and rabies, need to be considered.
Wound cleaning decreases the risk of infection.
Skin repair increases the risk of infection, and the decision to suture the skin balances the risk of infection versus the benefit of a better appearing scar.
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How long does a dog bite injury take to heal?

Injuries may involve structures deep beneath the skin including muscles, bones, nerves, and blood vessels. Infections, including tetanus and rabies, need to be considered. Wound cleaning decreases the risk of infection. Skin repair increases the risk of infection, and the decision to suture the skin balances the risk of infection versus the benefit of a better appearing scar.