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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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How is nocturnal hypoxia treated?

I have been diagnosed with noctural hypoxia but I exhibit signs of hypoxia during daytime also. Takes several days for symptoms to become noticeable. If use oxygen during day, no symptoms. Regular 6 min oxygen sat tests don t detect. Takes several days for oxygen levels to drop when no oxygen during day & several days for levels to rise when back on oxygen during day. I ve heard a test does exist that can definitely prove this exists. I found a dr who has heard of this but was subbing for primary at time & no one will tell me who she was or where located. 1st person in 2 yrs who knew it was true.
Fri, 26 Dec 2014
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Pulmonologist 's  Response
Hello dear, thanks for your question on HCM.
Nocturnal hypoxia can be seen in
1. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA)
2. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease )
3. CCF (congestive cardiac failure) etc
So better to consult pulmonologist and get done polysomnography (sleep study) first.
Chances of OSA are high.
If this is normal than get done chest x ray and PFT ( PULMONARY FUNCTION TEST ) to rule out COPD.
Get done 2D Echo to rule out CCF.
In my opinion sleep study will clearly indicate if hypoxia is present or not.
So consult pulmonologist and discuss all these.
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Recent questions on Hypoxia


How is nocturnal hypoxia treated?

Hello dear, thanks for your question on HCM. Nocturnal hypoxia can be seen in 1. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) 2. COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease ) 3. CCF (congestive cardiac failure) etc So better to consult pulmonologist and get done polysomnography (sleep study) first. Chances of OSA are high. If this is normal than get done chest x ray and PFT ( PULMONARY FUNCTION TEST ) to rule out COPD. Get done 2D Echo to rule out CCF. In my opinion sleep study will clearly indicate if hypoxia is present or not. So consult pulmonologist and discuss all these.