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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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High blood pressure and sinusitis

Whenever i have a bad attack of sinusitis my blood pressure goes up to 155/110 i also get pins and needles in my hands at the time. is this normal? what can be done to lower the blood pressure- whenever i get this i also have throbbing like pressure in my head and stabbing pains in my neck and upper spine
Thu, 10 Dec 2009
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There is no such thing as "the blood pressure", and the figures you quote are acceptable, - predictable, in fact if you're treating the sinusitis with medications like ephidrine. It would be odd if they didn't rise, so nothing to worry about there. Both systolic and mean arterial pressure can be lowered by sedation, rest, and of course, sleep. (Oddly, alcohol lowers both! - Shouldn't take it with medications, but if you measure your B/P's at 10 minute intervals while gradually getting intoxicated, you'll find they drift wonderfully down! -I promise!- try it, ...It's fun to observe!) Diastolic pressure (the lower one) is principally "response" to the body's "demand" for blood flow. Don't give that one a second thought. The stress (or distress, perhaps?) of having a sinusitis attack is partly to blame for the slight rise in both systolic and diastolic pressures. Again, demand and response, - perfectly normal. PS, - Mine frequently goes up to well over 200/110 and has done for years and years.....but then again, it comes down again to as low as 120/75 when I'm asleep. But then, I'm 80. Since I know exactly what's going on, what's causing it, what the risks are, and what myths are widely circulated about the (4) blood pressures, it doesn't worry me one jot. Incidentally, just because a young person's B/P's measured near his elbow is low, -say 130/75, doesn't mean that's the real pressure generated within the heart. That could be easily -say 200/120. But the elasticity of the upper arteries absorbs a large fraction of the 'generated pressure' so it only SEEMS low, at the brachial artery (near the elbow). So, -conversely, just because a person has high readings at the brachial artery, it doesn't mean necessarily that the cardiac generated pressure (within the left ventricle) is all that high. Depends on the elasticity of the arteries. The less elastic, the more accurately pressures further down the arteries reflect generated pressures, that's all.
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High blood pressure and sinusitis

There is no such thing as the blood pressure , and the figures you quote are acceptable, - predictable, in fact if you re treating the sinusitis with medications like ephidrine. It would be odd if they didn t rise, so nothing to worry about there. Both systolic and mean arterial pressure can be lowered by sedation, rest, and of course, sleep. (Oddly, alcohol lowers both! - Shouldn t take it with medications, but if you measure your B/P s at 10 minute intervals while gradually getting intoxicated, you ll find they drift wonderfully down! -I promise!- try it, ...It s fun to observe!) Diastolic pressure (the lower one) is principally response to the body s demand for blood flow. Don t give that one a second thought. The stress (or distress, perhaps?) of having a sinusitis attack is partly to blame for the slight rise in both systolic and diastolic pressures. Again, demand and response, - perfectly normal. PS, - Mine frequently goes up to well over 200/110 and has done for years and years.....but then again, it comes down again to as low as 120/75 when I m asleep. But then, I m 80. Since I know exactly what s going on, what s causing it, what the risks are, and what myths are widely circulated about the (4) blood pressures, it doesn t worry me one jot. Incidentally, just because a young person s B/P s measured near his elbow is low, -say 130/75, doesn t mean that s the real pressure generated within the heart. That could be easily -say 200/120. But the elasticity of the upper arteries absorbs a large fraction of the generated pressure so it only SEEMS low, at the brachial artery (near the elbow). So, -conversely, just because a person has high readings at the brachial artery, it doesn t mean necessarily that the cardiac generated pressure (within the left ventricle) is all that high. Depends on the elasticity of the arteries. The less elastic, the more accurately pressures further down the arteries reflect generated pressures, that s all.