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Electrical burns : First aid

Electrical burns: First aid An electrical burn may appear minor or not show on the skin at all, but the damage can extend deep into the tissues beneath your skin. If a strong electrical current passes through your body, internal damage, such as a heart rhythm disturbance or cardiac arrest, can occur. Sometimes the jolt associated with the electrical burn can cause you to be thrown or to fall, resulting in fractures or other associated injuries. Dial 911 or call for emergency medical assistance if the person who has been burned is in pain, is confused, or is experiencing changes in his or breathing, heartbeat or consciousness. While helping someone with an electrical burn and waiting for medical help, follow these steps: 1. Look first. Don't touch. The person may still be in contact with the electrical source. Touching the person may pass the current through you. 2. Turn off the source of electricity if possible. If not, move the source away from both you and the injured person using a dry nonconducting object made of cardboard, plastic or wood. 3. Check for signs of circulation (breathing, coughing or movement). If absent, begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) immediately. 4. Prevent shock. Lay the person down with the head slightly lower than the trunk and the legs elevated. 5. Cover the affected areas. If the person is breathing, cover any burned areas with a sterile gauze bandage, if available, or a clean cloth. Don't use a blanket or towel. Loose fibers can stick to the burns.
Thu, 29 Oct 2009
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's  Response
What are burns? The damage to body tissues on exposure to too much heat (dry or moist), cold (frostbite), radiation, electricity, friction, or chemicals is called a burn. Burns caused by hot water or steam, are called scalds. Burns are classified into first, second, and third degree, depending on the depth of tissue damage. A first-degree burn makes the skin red, like sunburn, while a second-degree burn causes blistering. A third-degree burn destroys the area of affected skin completely, resulting in serious scarring. Third-degree burns need special care. The treatment of burns depends on their depth and the extent and location of the area affected. How do they occur? First-degree burns heal quickly as they affect only the outer layer of the skin e.g. mild sunburn and brief contact with a heat source like a hot iron. Second-degree burns affect the lower layers of the skins as well, resulting in blisters (e.g. severe sunburn and burns caused by hot liquids). They usually heal without scarring unles
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Kevin Frankfurt's  Response

The first thing you should do in the case of a electricity burn is to try cooling the burn. Then remove contricting items before the area starts to swell cover the area with a dry ,sterile dressing and not cotton or other fluffy material then immediately go to the doctor.But the most important thing is that you should always carry a first aid kit with youself.You can take a look at this website http://www.gotoaid.com. It looks rather useful and very detailed - it includes everything you should utilize during "minor" emergencies

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viplavjain's  Response
How to take care of superficial burns (first or second degree)? * Immerse the affected area in cold or running water until the pain subsides. * Do not apply ice or cold water for too long. * Do not break any blisters that have formed. * Avoid applying antiseptic sprays, ointments, creams. Once dried, dress the area with a single layer of loose gauze that does not stick to the skin. * Keep the affected part higher than the rest of the body, if possible. * Consult the doctor if there are signs of infection (e.g., fever of 100 degrees F or higher, chills, increased redness, swelling or pus in the affected area) or if the burn shows no sign of improvement after two days. What are the guidelines to prevent burns? * Smokers should carefully dispose off cigarettes stubs. Cigarettes are a common cause of fires. * Keep match-boxes and cigarette lighters away from children. * Allow children to play with fireworks only with close adult supervision. * Never d
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