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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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Do Adults Also Suffer From ADD?

Hello. I am a 37 y/o healthy female and was diagnosed ADD as a child. I took Ritalin or Aderall through school, college and grad school but got off of them after graduating. I’ve known for quite some time that I needed to revisit getting back on some medication for ADD, as I’m having great difficulty staying focused at work and even when I make an extra effort to stay centered or focus, my mind just jumps all over the place. It’s become a challenge in my job and I would like to explore options.
Thu, 13 Jun 2019
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Neurologist 's  Response
Hi,

The proper diagnosis of add is challenging and should only be done after appropriate history, examination, and ancillary testing have ruled out other potential causes for impaired concentration and attention.

Things such as thyroid, adrenal, and other problems having to do with inborn errors of metabolism should be looked for and ruled out.

Neuropsychological testing should also be performed to identify psychological issues such as depression, anxiety, or PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) before a diagnosis of ADD is concluded.

Hope I have answered your query. Let me know if I can assist you further.

Regards,
Dr. Dariush Saghafi, Neurologist
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Do Adults Also Suffer From ADD?

Hi, The proper diagnosis of add is challenging and should only be done after appropriate history, examination, and ancillary testing have ruled out other potential causes for impaired concentration and attention. Things such as thyroid, adrenal, and other problems having to do with inborn errors of metabolism should be looked for and ruled out. Neuropsychological testing should also be performed to identify psychological issues such as depression, anxiety, or PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) before a diagnosis of ADD is concluded. Hope I have answered your query. Let me know if I can assist you further. Regards, Dr. Dariush Saghafi, Neurologist