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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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Can Infected Tooth Cause Symptoms Of Congestive Heart Failure?

Hyperventilating, sweats, coughing, no appetite. I went to my family doctor twice and 2 other doctors and they all said I had either pneumonis, bronchitis or asthmatic bronchitis. Each time, they put me on antibiotics and I would get better until about a week after I took the last one and then I started getting worse again. Then about 2-1/2 weeks ago I woke up one morning with a toothache. (up till then, I had absolutely NO tooth pain AT ALL!! The next day I went to my dentist and she xrayed it and said it was abcessed. I told her to pull it. 2 days later I started on 750 Amoxicillin twice a day. Started getting better. I looked on the web and according to what I read, abscessed tooth symptoms can mimic congestive heart failure. My family was on me to go to the heart doctor so I did and I told the cardiologist about the tooth being pulled and being on antibiotics but he ignored what I told him about the tooth and he still diagnosed me with congestive heart failure. I knew that couldn't be right because I had just been to my heart doctor for an annual checkup in March and I was fine. He insisted that I go in the hospital for tests which I did. By then the tooth had been out AND I had been on antibiotics for about 5 days. Got out last Friday and got better all weekend. On Tuesday, I got up early and walked almost 3.5 miles in the heat and my breath never even got elevated. All the symptoms I suffered with for 3 months are gone!! So, 3 MD's, 1 Nurse Practitioner and one Heart Doctor couldn't figure out what I did on my own, that it was all related to the abscessed tooth!!
Wed, 9 Mar 2016
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Critical Care Specialist 's  Response
Hi, I understand your concern. The only diagnosis that could relate a dental infection to a heart failure would be a infective endocarditis.

When there is the formation of dental abscess, it is possible that the bacteria that are causing the abscess fall into the bloodstream and become lodged in the heart valves and destroying them. The destruction of any heart valve is a very serious problem and requires a rigorous treatment in hospital, and prolonged use of intravenous antibiotics, arriving in extreme cases to heart surgery for valve replacement destroyed by a new valve.

A sign of injury in some cardiac valve is the presence of audible heart murmurs with stethoscope and better diagnosed as the use of transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography.

When there is a valvular destruction by endocarditis, the heart loses performance and led to heart failure. This heart failure is progressive and gets worse.

The story you reported is not compatible with a significant destruction of any heart valve to cause heart failure. However, if doubt persists, I suggest you again see your cardiologist and explain your question and if he agrees, you should seek a heart murmur or to request an echocardiogram.

Hope I have answered your question. If you have any further questions I will be happy to help you. Wish you good health.
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Can Infected Tooth Cause Symptoms Of Congestive Heart Failure?

Hi, I understand your concern. The only diagnosis that could relate a dental infection to a heart failure would be a infective endocarditis. When there is the formation of dental abscess, it is possible that the bacteria that are causing the abscess fall into the bloodstream and become lodged in the heart valves and destroying them. The destruction of any heart valve is a very serious problem and requires a rigorous treatment in hospital, and prolonged use of intravenous antibiotics, arriving in extreme cases to heart surgery for valve replacement destroyed by a new valve. A sign of injury in some cardiac valve is the presence of audible heart murmurs with stethoscope and better diagnosed as the use of transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography. When there is a valvular destruction by endocarditis, the heart loses performance and led to heart failure. This heart failure is progressive and gets worse. The story you reported is not compatible with a significant destruction of any heart valve to cause heart failure. However, if doubt persists, I suggest you again see your cardiologist and explain your question and if he agrees, you should seek a heart murmur or to request an echocardiogram. Hope I have answered your question. If you have any further questions I will be happy to help you. Wish you good health.