Get your health question answered instantly from our pool of 18000+ doctors from over 80 specialties
152 Doctors Online

By proceeding, I accept the Terms and Conditions

Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

HCM Blog Instant Access to Doctors
HCM BlogQuestions Answered
HCM Blog Satisfaction

Can Dieting Bring OCD Symptoms Under Control?

My grandson has been diagnosed with OCD and is taking a medication (can t recall the name, but it is the one that has the potential for breast enlargement in boys, he is 10). I am somewhat of a health advocate and very diet conscience. My concern is that he dose not have a very good diet. Too much sugar for one thing and very few vegetables day to day. How important is diet for controlling OCD symptoms and what is a good source for this information? I need something to show the parents and other grandparents. Thank you for any help you can give.
Fri, 22 Sep 2017
Report Abuse
Dietitian & Nutritionist 's  Response
Welcome to HCM,
Oh my, I do understand your concern. This is a very common side effect of some of the medications. The problem is..finding a medication that WORKS yet has low potential for gynomastia (enlargement of the breasts) or in some women, the excretion of milk.

Yes, a good diet is a great recommendation as a starting point for addressing any problem. However, I do not know of any diet that will take care of this side-effect. Treatments for his condition range from banding, to trying another medication and monitoring closely coupled with behavioral therapy, to a brain scan to see if something is awry with his pituitary and I don't recommend the latter.

Now, how important is diet in actually "controlling" OCD? Some physicians say that by eating foods that may increase serotonin in the brain will help, but I do not think anything beyond this should be done without seeing an integrative Dietitian or Physician. The foods he can try are: protein-rich foods like turkey, chicken, milk, eggs and cottage cheese; whole grains like brown rice and quinoa; beans and legumes; pumpkin; sunflower and sesame seeds; nuts; and root vegetables.

I cannot emphasize the importance of psychotherapy. Ongoing cognitive therapy is very very beneficial.

I hope I have given you an idea of something you can control to assist in your grandson's recovery. I will be blunt by saying there are many powders and pills that work on neurotransmitters. Individuals without such training to deal with these "designer" nutrients can do harm rather than good.

You have a kind heart. I wish you and your family the best.

Kathy J. Shattler,MS,RDN
I find this answer helpful
Disclaimer: These answers are for your information only and not intended to replace your relationship with your treating physician.
This is a short, free answer. For a more detailed, immediate answer, try our premium service [Sample answer]
Share on
 
Can Dieting Bring OCD Symptoms Under Control?

Welcome to HCM, Oh my, I do understand your concern. This is a very common side effect of some of the medications. The problem is..finding a medication that WORKS yet has low potential for gynomastia (enlargement of the breasts) or in some women, the excretion of milk. Yes, a good diet is a great recommendation as a starting point for addressing any problem. However, I do not know of any diet that will take care of this side-effect. Treatments for his condition range from banding, to trying another medication and monitoring closely coupled with behavioral therapy, to a brain scan to see if something is awry with his pituitary and I don t recommend the latter. Now, how important is diet in actually controlling OCD? Some physicians say that by eating foods that may increase serotonin in the brain will help, but I do not think anything beyond this should be done without seeing an integrative Dietitian or Physician. The foods he can try are: protein-rich foods like turkey, chicken, milk, eggs and cottage cheese; whole grains like brown rice and quinoa; beans and legumes; pumpkin; sunflower and sesame seeds; nuts; and root vegetables. I cannot emphasize the importance of psychotherapy. Ongoing cognitive therapy is very very beneficial. I hope I have given you an idea of something you can control to assist in your grandson s recovery. I will be blunt by saying there are many powders and pills that work on neurotransmitters. Individuals without such training to deal with these designer nutrients can do harm rather than good. You have a kind heart. I wish you and your family the best. Kathy J. Shattler,MS,RDN