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Dr. Andrew Rynne
MD
Dr. Andrew Rynne

Family Physician

Exp 50 years

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hello dr. have you heard of the jesus shot, and

Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Bonnie Berger-Durnbaugh

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :1991

Answered : 3129 Questions

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Posted on Tue, 19 Feb 2019 in Pain Management
Question: hello dr. have you heard of the jesus shot, and if so please tell me and a lot of others what you think of it and would you use it on your clients. thank you. sincerely, XXXXXXX knight.
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Follow up: Dr. Bonnie Berger-Durnbaugh 33 minutes later
YYYY@YYYY This is my g-mail address. XXXXXXX Knight
doctor
Answered by Dr. Bonnie Berger-Durnbaugh 1 hour later
Brief Answer:
Looks "shady" - I would be cautious, the creator is a convicted felon.

Detailed Answer:
Hello and welcome,

The "Jesus Shot" is an injection created and only available by a particular physician (Dr. Lonergan) in Oklahoma, and the medical community does not definitively know what he puts in it. However, it is known that this particular doctor has an extensive criminal record, including 8 felonies and medical fraud, so I would be very hesitant to try it. He charges a lot of money for it and does not say what is in it. It's speculated that it contains a corticosteroid (which many orthopedic doctors use), and Vitamin B12.

Here is information on it from a reporter from the Associated Press:

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What is a ‘Jesus shot’ and what’s it supposed to do?
WILL WEISSERT
April 12, 2016
XXXXXXX XXXXXXX (AP) — The XXXXXXX agriculture commissioner spent at least $1,120 in taxpayer money to travel to Oklahoma last year. XXXXXXX Miller says he made the trip to meet with elected officials, but the XXXXXXX Chronicle reported that while there he may have received a “Jesus shot” that supposedly offers long-term relief from pain. Here’s a look at the procedure:

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Q: WHAT IS A “JESUS SHOT?”

A: An anti-inflammatory injection that is supposed to reduce chronic pain. It is available only through its developer, Dr. XXXXXXX XXXXXXX Lonergan in Oklahoma, and reportedly costs $300.
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Q: WHO IS LONERGAN?

A: In 2004, Lonergan was convicted in Ohio of eight felonies, including health care and mail fraud and tax evasion. His medical license was revoked by that state, and he was sentenced to two years in prison.

Lonergan is now licensed to practice medicine in Oklahoma. A 1976 graduate of the University of the XXXXXXX School of Medicine at San XXXXXXX his specialties are pediatrics, anesthesiology and emergency medicine.

His medical license lists Lonergan’s practice at the Oklahoma Health and Wellness Center in Weatherford, west of Oklahoma City. Calls there were referred to a cellphone belonging to Lonergan’s secretary. She did not return messages Tuesday.

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Q: WHAT’S IN THE SHOT?

A: Lonergan has not said. But XXXXXXX Schrick, owner of Full Circle Health in Edmond, Oklahoma, which once housed Lonergan’s practice, has written that it contains Dexamethasone, Kenalog and vitamin B12.

Dexamethasone is a hormone used to treat disorders including arthritis. Kenalog is a brand name for a synthetic anti-inflammatory medication. A B12 deficiency can cause joint pain.

Schrick wrote about the procedure in a 2014 issue of Thrive Magazine, a health and wellness periodical where she serves on the board of directors. She reported that the dosage “differs depending on the patient’s general health, age, weight, medical history and so on.” The administering doctor, she said, performs a “thorough one-hour review” with each patient to rule out allergies and interactions with other medications.

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Q: WHY IS IT CALLED A “JESUS SHOT”?

A: An ordained minister, Schrick wrote that “Jesus shot” is a “term of endearment coined by Dr. Lonergan. He credits Jesus with the idea to combine the ingredients in one injection.” She said that her clinic did not use the term and instead referred to the procedure as “inflammation protocol.”

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Q: WHAT DOES IT DO?

A: Schrick wrote that the shot has been mischaracterized in the media, saying: “There is no claim that the injection cures pain for life.”


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Vaishalee Punj
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