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White spots on throat, no pain. Cause?

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Posted on Thu, 4 Oct 2012
Question: I have white spots in my throat no pain what could be the cause?
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Answered by Dr. Sumit Bhatti (3 hours later)
Hi,

Thank you for your query.

1. The small white spots and redness on the posterior pharyngeal wall is known as granular pharyngitis.

2. Get a throat swab taken from the precise area under vision to rule out a local bacterial or fungal infection. Check if it bleeds or appears traumatized after the swab.

3. A differential will include mostly benign conditions such as an area of lymphoid hypertrophy, accessory lymphoid tissue, inflamed minor salivary gland tissue, papillomas, an allergic reaction, local fungal infection and so on. Have you had any recent dental work? Have you noticed any decreased salivation or halitosis (bad breath)?

4. A Post Nasal Drip and Acid reflux cause such symptoms.

5. Besides the culture, Sinus X-rays or CT, routine blood tests may be advised by your physician.

6. The simplest course of action will be a course of antibiotics, anti-allergics, anti-inflammatory agents and medicated gargles and anti-reflux mediction. If there is no improvement or the area of the patch increases a short course of steroid, if not contraindicated, will help.

I hope that I have answered your queries. If you have any further questions, I will be available to answer them.

Regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Sumit Bhatti

Otolaryngologist / ENT Specialist

Practicing since :1991

Answered : 2662 Questions

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White spots on throat, no pain. Cause?

Hi,

Thank you for your query.

1. The small white spots and redness on the posterior pharyngeal wall is known as granular pharyngitis.

2. Get a throat swab taken from the precise area under vision to rule out a local bacterial or fungal infection. Check if it bleeds or appears traumatized after the swab.

3. A differential will include mostly benign conditions such as an area of lymphoid hypertrophy, accessory lymphoid tissue, inflamed minor salivary gland tissue, papillomas, an allergic reaction, local fungal infection and so on. Have you had any recent dental work? Have you noticed any decreased salivation or halitosis (bad breath)?

4. A Post Nasal Drip and Acid reflux cause such symptoms.

5. Besides the culture, Sinus X-rays or CT, routine blood tests may be advised by your physician.

6. The simplest course of action will be a course of antibiotics, anti-allergics, anti-inflammatory agents and medicated gargles and anti-reflux mediction. If there is no improvement or the area of the patch increases a short course of steroid, if not contraindicated, will help.

I hope that I have answered your queries. If you have any further questions, I will be available to answer them.

Regards.