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What Is The Current Recommended Treatment For Child ODD?

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Posted on Thu, 21 Apr 2022
Question: What is the current recommed treatment for child o.d.d.

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Answered by Dr. Sumanth Amperayani (23 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
ODD and management

Detailed Answer:

Hello,

The ODD has certain characters:

Recurrent negative, defiant, disobedient, and hostile behavior toward authority figures, including:
- Losing temper
- Arguing with adults
- Actively defying or refusing to comply with adults' requests or rules
- Deliberately annoying people
- Blaming others for his or her mistakes or misbehavior
- Being touchy or easily annoyed by others
- Being angry and resentful
- Being spiteful or vindictive

Their excessive activity, impulsive response style, and disinhibited emotional expression frequently put them in conflict with parents and other adults. The increased conflict may lead to increased discipline and less positive reinforcement for the child. Under these circumstances, a potentially self-perpetuating pattern of oppositional defiant behavior can emerge (the oppositional acts bring parental attention, which is reinforcing for the child who rarely receives parental praise).

The cornerstones of treatment for ODD usually include:

Parent training. A mental health professional with experience treating ODD may help you develop parenting skills that are more consistent, positive and less frustrating for you and your child. In some cases, your child may participate in this training with you, so everyone in your family develops shared goals for how to handle problems. Involving other authority figures, such as teachers, in the training may be an important part of treatment.
Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT). During PCIT, a therapist coaches parents while they interact with their child. In one approach, the therapist sits behind a one-way mirror and, using an "ear bug" audio device, guides parents through strategies that reinforce their child's positive behavior. As a result, parents learn more-effective parenting techniques, the quality of the parent-child relationship improves, and problem behaviors decrease.

Individual and family therapy. Individual therapy for your child may help him or her learn to manage anger and express feelings in a healthier way. Family therapy may help improve your communication and relationships and help members of your family learn how to work together.

Cognitive problem-solving training. This type of therapy is aimed at helping your child identify and change thought patterns that lead to behavior problems. Collaborative problem-solving — in which you and your child work together to come up with solutions that work for both of you — can help improve ODD-related problems.

Social skills training. Your child may also benefit from therapy that will help him or her be more flexible and learn how to interact more positively and effectively with peers.

Regards,
Dr. Sumanth Amperayani
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Remy Koshy
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Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Sumanth Amperayani

Pediatrician, Pulmonology

Practicing since :2003

Answered : 8341 Questions

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What Is The Current Recommended Treatment For Child ODD?

Brief Answer: ODD and management Detailed Answer: Hello, The ODD has certain characters: Recurrent negative, defiant, disobedient, and hostile behavior toward authority figures, including: - Losing temper - Arguing with adults - Actively defying or refusing to comply with adults' requests or rules - Deliberately annoying people - Blaming others for his or her mistakes or misbehavior - Being touchy or easily annoyed by others - Being angry and resentful - Being spiteful or vindictive Their excessive activity, impulsive response style, and disinhibited emotional expression frequently put them in conflict with parents and other adults. The increased conflict may lead to increased discipline and less positive reinforcement for the child. Under these circumstances, a potentially self-perpetuating pattern of oppositional defiant behavior can emerge (the oppositional acts bring parental attention, which is reinforcing for the child who rarely receives parental praise). The cornerstones of treatment for ODD usually include: Parent training. A mental health professional with experience treating ODD may help you develop parenting skills that are more consistent, positive and less frustrating for you and your child. In some cases, your child may participate in this training with you, so everyone in your family develops shared goals for how to handle problems. Involving other authority figures, such as teachers, in the training may be an important part of treatment. Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT). During PCIT, a therapist coaches parents while they interact with their child. In one approach, the therapist sits behind a one-way mirror and, using an "ear bug" audio device, guides parents through strategies that reinforce their child's positive behavior. As a result, parents learn more-effective parenting techniques, the quality of the parent-child relationship improves, and problem behaviors decrease. Individual and family therapy. Individual therapy for your child may help him or her learn to manage anger and express feelings in a healthier way. Family therapy may help improve your communication and relationships and help members of your family learn how to work together. Cognitive problem-solving training. This type of therapy is aimed at helping your child identify and change thought patterns that lead to behavior problems. Collaborative problem-solving — in which you and your child work together to come up with solutions that work for both of you — can help improve ODD-related problems. Social skills training. Your child may also benefit from therapy that will help him or her be more flexible and learn how to interact more positively and effectively with peers. Regards, Dr. Sumanth Amperayani