question-icon

What does this MRI report indicate?

default
Posted on Wed, 25 May 2016
Question: I had an MRI ON 03/05/2016. It shows that My S1 nerve is "nearly completely effaced". I had back surgery in that area in 2009 and the surgeon told me at that time that i may not totally regain feeling in leg. My current spine pain management doc said it was a "failed surgery" but I'm still glad I did the surgery at the time because of the pain relief. My MRI from 07/2014 only showed a small scar but it appears the scarring has expanded. What could happen to this nerve at this "nearly complete effacement" stage?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Erion Spaho (40 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Another word for nerve compression.

Detailed Answer:
Hello and thanks for using HCM.

I have read your question and understand your concerns.

Nerve effacement is a term used to describe nerve root compression.

Nearly total effacement means that the S1 nerve is compressed heavily by another structure such intervertebral disc, fibrosis (or scar tissue), bone spur etc.

In this case the nerve looses its functions leaving the muscles and skin that it supply without innervation resulting in muscles atrophy, loss of sensation ( touch, pain, temperature ) in the supplied area.

The degree of the nerve function can be measured by nerve conduction study and electromyography.

The main aim of surgery in cases of nerve compression and herniated disc disease is to reduce pain and reduce further deterioration, so, if you were free of pain after the surgery, it is not completely failed surgery, even though it didn't restore the complete nerve functionality.

Hope you found the answer helpful.

Let me know if I can assist you further.

Greetings.

Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Naveen Kumar
doctor
default
Follow up: Dr. Erion Spaho (30 minutes later)
Thank you for your prompt answer. I agree that the surgery was worth the effort. It appears that each radiologist uses their own lingo when using the words compression vs. effacement. would that most likely explain why, over time, it has been more difficult to climb stairs, or when I use the rest room I can't walk for a while. Would a raised toilet seat help with that rest room problem?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Erion Spaho (22 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
Those symptoms may be explained by nerve compression.

Detailed Answer:
Welcome back.

Nerve damage could result in muscle weakness and dysfunction, so, this condition can cause movement difficulties such those mentioned by you.

I think, raised toilet seat may help you getting up from toilet more easily and start walking sooner.

Hope I helped you.

Best regards.
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Arnab Banerjee
doctor
Answered by
Dr.
Dr. Erion Spaho

Neurologist, Surgical

Practicing since :2004

Answered : 4272 Questions

premium_optimized

The User accepted the expert's answer

Share on
What does this MRI report indicate?

Brief Answer: Another word for nerve compression. Detailed Answer: Hello and thanks for using HCM. I have read your question and understand your concerns. Nerve effacement is a term used to describe nerve root compression. Nearly total effacement means that the S1 nerve is compressed heavily by another structure such intervertebral disc, fibrosis (or scar tissue), bone spur etc. In this case the nerve looses its functions leaving the muscles and skin that it supply without innervation resulting in muscles atrophy, loss of sensation ( touch, pain, temperature ) in the supplied area. The degree of the nerve function can be measured by nerve conduction study and electromyography. The main aim of surgery in cases of nerve compression and herniated disc disease is to reduce pain and reduce further deterioration, so, if you were free of pain after the surgery, it is not completely failed surgery, even though it didn't restore the complete nerve functionality. Hope you found the answer helpful. Let me know if I can assist you further. Greetings.