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What does this HIV test result indicate?

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Posted on Tue, 24 Apr 2018
Question: A year ago I got tested for HIV/STDs, when I called for my results they said everything was ok. but i was checking my blue cross blue shield statements and I saw the results for that test. I need to have them explained to me.
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Answered by Dr. Panagiotis Zografakis (57 minutes later)
Brief Answer:
negative for most viruses

Detailed Answer:
Hello,

my first comment is that the results as they're presented are almost unreadable as the values are not clear and the normal range is not indicated nor is the units used for the measurement (Unk is not a unit - I suppose it means unknown?). Anyway, a zero result in antibody or antigen assay means that there is no antibody or antigen, therefore the disease we're looking for has not produced any detectable evidence of its existence. This means that the results are negative. One little exception is with herpes simplex viruses, as there is a positive value in IgG and IgM antibodies. This test for herpes simplex is not very accurate sometimes and I couldn't interpret the result without the lab's normal range for this test but it seems that you've come into contact with herpes simplex (either type 1 or type 2 or both) at some time in the past. This is expected for most individuals though as herpes simplex is a very common virus. Regarding hepatitis B and C the results are negative, although the surface antigen is not enough to exclude viral hepatitis B. A negative surface antigen has to be complemented with negative antibodies (both IgG and IgM and a negative antibody to surface antigen) to be sure that you've never come into contact with hepatitis.

So in conclusion, no definite interpretation can be done without knowing the lab's normal range for these tests but it seems that herpes simplex is the only virus that you've been exposed to in the past.

I hope it helps!
Kind Regards!
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Panagiotis Zografakis

Internal Medicine Specialist

Practicing since :1999

Answered : 3767 Questions

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What does this HIV test result indicate?

Brief Answer: negative for most viruses Detailed Answer: Hello, my first comment is that the results as they're presented are almost unreadable as the values are not clear and the normal range is not indicated nor is the units used for the measurement (Unk is not a unit - I suppose it means unknown?). Anyway, a zero result in antibody or antigen assay means that there is no antibody or antigen, therefore the disease we're looking for has not produced any detectable evidence of its existence. This means that the results are negative. One little exception is with herpes simplex viruses, as there is a positive value in IgG and IgM antibodies. This test for herpes simplex is not very accurate sometimes and I couldn't interpret the result without the lab's normal range for this test but it seems that you've come into contact with herpes simplex (either type 1 or type 2 or both) at some time in the past. This is expected for most individuals though as herpes simplex is a very common virus. Regarding hepatitis B and C the results are negative, although the surface antigen is not enough to exclude viral hepatitis B. A negative surface antigen has to be complemented with negative antibodies (both IgG and IgM and a negative antibody to surface antigen) to be sure that you've never come into contact with hepatitis. So in conclusion, no definite interpretation can be done without knowing the lab's normal range for these tests but it seems that herpes simplex is the only virus that you've been exposed to in the past. I hope it helps! Kind Regards!